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  1. Full paper here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X18315652 Note sure if anyone wrote about this. I couldn't find any results for VC2 in the site's search. This is a live attenuated vaccine from Louisiana State University. The results do not seem super promising, as reducing shedding/recurrance by < 70% pre-clinical is common in many discontinued vaccines. Still, research is being done, which is always great! Prophylactic conclusions: "Our studies also showed that VC2 vaccine decreases the clinical severity of acute and recurrent HSV-2 disease in guinea pigs when provided by intramuscular vaccination. During the primary infection, animals vaccinated with VC2 had a significant decrease in clinical severity and replicating virus in the vaginal vault. Prophylactic vaccination also decreased the quantity of virus in the DRGs when compared to the No Treatment group. The ability to protect neural tissue from latent infection probably contributed to the decrease in the number of animals with recurrent lesions by 67% and the number of days with recurrent vaginal shedding by 46%. This reduction in shedding is particularly important because transmission of HSV-2 to uninfected persons is largely due to asymptomatic shedding [38], [39]." Theraputic conclusions: "When tested as a therapeutic vaccine, i.e., one designed to decrease recurrent disease and recurrent virus shedding in those already infected with HSV, the VC2 vaccine was not effective although it did reduce recurrent shedding, at least when compared to the gD2 vaccine. This may be because live attenuated vaccines have only limited replication in hosts that are already infected and thus do not have much of an impact in improving the immune response. Because infected hosts have frequent reactivations of virus that would be similar to a live vaccine inoculation it may be difficult for the vaccine to improve the immune response unless it is able to induce responses not activated by the host’s recurrent virus replication."
  2. Hey all, Found this on GEN-03, the vaccine that couldn't fund the final trials. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31103365?dopt=Abstract Seems like they are trying to find investors possibly. Does anyone have insight on this? I would love to have a series of vaccine shots versus a daily antiviral pill.
  3. I'm sure a lot of you Google "hsv2-cure" daily like me. Looks like there may be a twinkle of hope. Not a cure, but at least some new news. https://www.precisionvaccinations.com/gen-003-therapeutic-bivalent-vaccine-candidate-genital-herpes-simplex-virus-type-2-hsv-2
  4. ManagingIllness

    Reality of New Vaccines

    I want this to be a real, straight up, informative dialogue about the timeline of new vaccine's and what their impact will be on the lives of those with HSV. I will try my best to impart my knowledge of the process and the current state of affairs. Please correct me where I am wrong, and present further developments. I want people who are newly infected to read this forum and get a thorough understanding of the state of upcoming therapies for HSV, specifically therapeutic vaccines. Firstly, please read this page in full: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes_simplex_research. It covers all the current developments in an easy to understand way. If you're interested in this topic, it's a MUST READ. Secondly, if you found this useful/informative, please up-vote, share in other discussions, and reply! Clinical study terminology and timelines Animal studies: Can this therapy provide some benefit to animals while not being toxic to them? Spend several years conducting these studies just to get the interest of academic comities that provide grants, and big pharma. If successful, proceed. Phase I studies: The therapy proved well-tolerated in animals and provided some notable benefit. Let's test if ~20 people can safely tolerate this therapy, and document any results, with a specific focus on adverse side-effects as opposed to medical benefit. Phase IIa studies: The phase 1 study implied that the vaccine is well-tolerated in humans and provides some notable – and profitable - benefit. Let's get a pool of ~100 to ~200 people, give some of them fake injections (placebos) and others various amounts of the injection. Goal: reaffirm that the vaccine is safe, and try to find an optimal dosing for further studies. Spend over a year conducting the study and a year collecting results after. Phase IIb studies: We have invested years and millions into studies already. Let’s take ~300 to ~600 people and inject them with the two most promising injection routines from Phase IIa. Goal: reaffirm safety (once again!), and find the optimal dosing routine to take into Phase III trials. Goal: get investors super excited about the results of our optimal dosing strategy in order to secure funds for the upcoming, massive phase III trials. Spend over a year conducting the study and a year collecting results after. Phase III: Conduct a massive, multi-city, and sometimes multi-continental, study involving > 1000 participants. Test on different population groups (e.g. different ethnicity) to ensure the therapy is effective in the widest range or recipients. Spend over a year conducting the study and a year collecting results after. Final phase: Request acceptance from regulatory body (e.g. FDA) Timeline from animal studies to your doctor’s office: over 10 years! Basic mechanisms of action All therapeutic vaccines currently in the work simply bolster your immune system. That’s it. They attempt to continually present foreign viral markers – known as antigens – to your body. The desired result is immune system stimulation such that your body is constantly prioritizing those antigens for production of cells that can target, kill, and deactivate other cells presenting those antigens. The analogy would be like providing night vision to your immune system. The effect is that it will never lose track of the HSV virus, and will squelch it during any replication, before symptoms can develop. None of these will “cure” HSV, as the virus a) remains undetectable to the immune system while latent, and b) never uniformly comes out of latency all at the same time. The current state of affairs We are unlikely to see any new therapies for HSV within the next few years. The soonest is likely ~2021. It's likely that the newest therapy will be a vaccine that will cut the rates of outbreaks by about 80%, and shedding (your ability to pass on the virus even without symptoms) by 50-60%. There are two vaccines that promise to do this, so even if one is discontinued, we'll likely have 1 proceed to production: Genocea's GEN-003 & Admedus' HSV 2 vaccine. Both of these vaccines recently finished Phase II studies. GEN-003 is currently done Phase IIb studies, and is preparing for commencement of Phase III. Overall these are great developments, and we’re much farther along than we were 10 year sago. Theravax Although I am a huge fan of using live-attenuated viruses, the current uninformed & ignorant political/cultural view about the dangers of live vaccines is a huge impediment to any live-attenuated virus vaccine. Two very real incidences in the USA caused great concern over the safety of live vaccines. Follow this link and read "2. Historical Events" for details: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4599698/ Today’s live-attenuated vaccines are genetically & intelligently modified through modern advances in biotechnology (you know, the kind of advances you’d expect to have been made between the 1950s-1970s and 2017). Computers & the internet are pretty nifty technological advances for instance. Gene editing technology is also a pretty dope advancement, as is the ability to sequence genomes. Yet, despite the tremendous aforementioned leaps in scientific knowledge, live-attenuated vaccines are still seen as sub-optimal therapies – and perhaps more importantly as sub-optimal monetary investments. (Interestingly, they have been deployed successfully and safely for the chicken pox and shingles, which are within the herpes family of viruses.) What does this all mean? It means that live-attenuated viruses have a good chance of providing an effective therapy for HSV suffers, (some event talk of a “functional cure”) but there has been very little progress, as no HSV live-attenuated vaccine is advanced passed Phase I trials at present. Your doctor won’t have one of these on hand for at least 5 years. Unfortunately, when it comes to public deployment of live-attenuated viruses, think ~2025, if at all. What this means for you - for us You can Google “herpes vaccine” everyday the next few years, and all you’ll learn about is incremental progress on the aforementioned therapies. Checking in every 3 months is sound, but more frequently than that will do you no good. This process is slow, thorny, and unwieldly. Be excited when Phase III studies commence, and follow them when they conclude. Just know that we are years away from a notable advancement that will be available at your local doctor’s office with partial coverage from your health insurance (e.g., Gardasil) Optimistic, unproven aside No matter the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines, if they are approved by regulators it will be because they are first-and-foremost safe. I imagine that they can then be used off-label by discordant couples. In other words, HSV-negative partners can take the vaccine to possible reduce their risk, so if both partners take it, it's absolutely possible that the risk of spreading the virus will be further lowered. Please understand that there is no evidence for this last possibility. However, from my understanding of how these vaccines work - invoking the immune system to have a response to HSV for at least 2 years - I think it to be highly likely that off-label use will be, well, useful. At it's worse, such use of the therapeutic vaccine's will limit the severity and extensiveness of a partner's initial outbreak.
  5. There are only a few things that keep me from ending my life. My son, God, and my family. I can't understand why we get so much false hope. Researcher claim timelines for cures that may never come. It hurts!!!! Yes, I got myself into this situation, but I would love to believe that one day I could be free of this virus. I'm afraid to work and even hug my own child. Then there is the question of how long have I had type 1 since it is not tested for in the standard panel. My mind can't take much more. @Hansje I love the post that the moral body is what has this virus and in the after life it will not. That is the bright spot.
  6. http://ir.genocea.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=1041589 This was kinda expected after the phase 2 results? So, what's next? Which vaccine should we be rooting for?
  7. Hello everyone I posted yesterday indicating I had spoken to Dr. Veloz about my situation, she has indicated I am a good candidate for the vaccine with my symptoms. Does anyone know what type of price ballpark I can be expected to be quoted? I remember seeing something on this forum recently indicating they thought three injections (which is what she told me I need) would be around $4500. Can anyone confirm this information is correct?
  8. https://www.change.org/p/minister-ministry-of-health-and-long-term-care-hsv-1-2-to-be-added-to-the-std-panel-of-testing?recruiter=44235138&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=share_petition
  9. Found a good article what do you think ? https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/can-we-gene-edit-herpes-away-180968551/
  10. Today i saw on Dr Josh Blooms comments about he is saying he contacted to Albert Einstein’s researchers to have interview about their vaccine. I think this interview will make clear about how is going with their vaccine.
  11. Hi all, I reached out to Prof Frazer of Admedus Immunotherapies; you may know that he was the person who developed the vaccine for HPV (genital warts). I explained to him that I was trying to find a way to help, potentially though crowdfunding. I was quite surprised when he replied and passed my e-mail on to the CEO, Neil Finlayson. Now granted, the company is not that big, so passing on a mail isn't that surprising. However, Finlayson did e-mail me to say that their capital was currently directed at HPV research and in order to do Phase 2b HSV trials they were looking for $6m. Could I help to raise the money? I was quite surprised by how candid they were, but I guess that answers my earlier post where it felt (from reading the Admedus fiancial report) that the company's HSV vaccine development did not seem to be going ahead fast enough. https://honeycomb.click/topic/73822-will-prof-frazer-continue-with-hsv2-vaccine-research/?tab=comments#comment-451965 The point of this post is that I am trying to hear from people who may have done crowdfunding for herpes research before. If I do set something up, I will not send links from this forum as it is against the rules. However, I would appreciate to hear from people who have experience in internet marketing, grassroots movements and crowdfunding. I really think that instead of being on forums complaining about our condition and feeling helpless, we should start to do whatever we can to accelerate the research. Thanks
  12. Hi all, As you know, Prof Ian Frazer is working on a HSV2 vaccine. He is known for having developed the HPV vaccine. The company that he works for is Admedus Immunotherapies, which has Admedus as the major shareholder. I was watching the video from the Nov 2017 annual general meeting (see below) and at about 42 min the COO of Admedus says that they have addressed the issue of not enough cash going to Admedus Immunotherapies by getting an external party to major a major investment (announcement to follow soon). You will see that the COO talks about the HSV and HPV research they have going on. Initially I thought this was great, but when I looked at their annual report on page 10, it says the following: ----"Last year Admedus Immunotherapies (AI) continued to progress its core technologies. During the period, AI received the final results from the Herpes Simplex 2 (HSV-2) Phase IIa study, which showed a level of activity in people infected with HSV-2. The board of AI are currently assessing its options in terms of next steps with this program. In addition, AI has continued to progress its Human Papillomavirus (HPV) programs. The HPV DNA vaccine targeting HPV related head and neck cancer is progressing towards its initial clinical study looking at its safety in people with HPV related cancer as well as secondary markers around activity. In addition, the team has continued to progress the collaboration with Translate Bio (formerly RaNA Therapeutics) on RNA vaccines targeting HPV and related cancers. AI has operating capital for the coming year, including sufficient capital to initiate the HPV head and neck study. The board of AI are currently undertaking a review of the potential strategic options available to the them to secure the continuing development of AI’s technologies in a manner that balances maximising their potential with returns for its shareholders." https://admedus.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/2016-2017-Annual-Report.pdf Now to me it sounds like Admedus are a lot more optimistic about their HPV research than their HSV research. I mean there's basically nothing there about HSV. Any thoughts?
  13. http://www.profectusbiosciences.com/pipeline/pbsvax.html#hsv-2 HSV-2 Profectus is developing a GeneVax® prime/VesiculoVax™ boost therapeutic vaccine for herpes simplex virus type-2. This vaccine is designed to ameliorate disease and transmission by preventing HSV-2 reactivation and shedding.Program Status: Antigen discovery stage. Unmet Medical Need: Herpes simplex virus type 2 is a sexually transmitted virus that causes watery lesions in the skin and mucus membranes of the genitals. It establishes latency in neurons, from where it can sporadically reactivate to cause shedding/transmission with or without new sores. The CDC estimates that 776,000 people in the United States are newly infected each year. Currently, control is only possible with life-long drug treatment.
  14. What do you guys think about this article about a doctor following studies about how apparently in Paris the live attenuated vaccine for shingles pretty much cured oral outbreaks in all the patients compared to the control group for years? http://jeffreydachmd.com/2015/06/shingles-vaccine-for-recurrent-herpes-simplex/
  15. Yet another vaccine candidate in preclinical stage https://www.genvec.com/product-pipeline/gv2207-hsv-2-immunotherapeutic
  16. Those results look promising for suppressing outbreaks if it is true. But if these results have been known for so long why hasn't it been made known for HSV1&2 sufferers so they can have some relief? The study doesn't say but I wonder what, if any, impact it has on shedding and replication.
  17. What do think will end up being a workable cure for those already infected with HSV-1 and HSV-2? 1. CRISPR/Cas9 2. CRISPR method discovered by Salk team with no cutting. Thus would likely put the HSV virus into a permanent latent state. 3. HCV virus peptide. This may be Abe to remove the virus without harming the cell (?). 4. One of the few vaccines in the works. 5. Vaccine from HHMI using a mutant HSV virus with gD deleted. No news for 2 years but apparently they are working on it. What’s going on? 5. Forcing the virus to stay awake and detectable by the immune system so it can fight it off. 6. Forcing it stay latent so it cannot shed/replicate. 7. Some as of yet unknown entity working on a cure.
  18. For all the vaccine, CRISPR and other work we know is being done for HSV1/2 do you believe there is likely also just as much work being done off the radar that the general public is it not even aware of?
  19. How many years away do you imagine a workable therapeutic cure will be?
  20. Interesting: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes_simplex_research
  21. There are so many wealthy people in the world afflicted by herpes 1 and/or 2. Celebrities and rich and powerful people suffer from these diseases the same as the rest of us. If there was concerted effort and money applied to it this could certainly be solved in the nearer term but alas there is no such movement or focus. This needs to change.
  22. Has anyone heard any updated news about this? https://www.hhmi.org/news/radical-vaccine-design-effective-against-herpes-viruses Herpes simplex virus infections are an enormous global health problem and there is currently no viable vaccine. For nearly three decades, immunologists’ efforts to develop a herpes vaccine have centered on exploiting a single protein found on the virus’s outer surface that is known to elicit robust production of antibodies. Breaking from this approach, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have created a genetic mutant lacking that protein. The result is a powerfully effective vaccine against herpes viruses. “We have a very promising new candidate for herpes,” says William Jacobs, an HHMI investigator at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, “but this might also be a good candidate as a vaccine vector for other mucosal diseases, particularly HIV and tuberculosis.” The new vaccine was found to be effective against the two most common forms of herpes that cause cold sores (HSV-1) and genital ulcers (HSV-2). Both are known to infect the body’s nerve cells, where the virus can lay dormant for years before symptoms reappear. The new vaccine is the first to prevent this type of latent infection. “With herpes sores you continually get them,” Jacobs says. “If our vaccine works in humans as it does in mice, administering it early in life could completely eliminate herpes latency.” Jacobs and his colleagues reported their findings on March 10, 2015, in the journal eLife. HSV-2 is a lifelong, incurable infection that causes recurrent and painful genital sores and increases susceptibility to HIV. Also, babies born to mothers with active genital herpes can have a more than 80 percent mortality rate, if untreated. Current estimates suggest that 500 million people worldwide are infected with HSV-2, with approximately 20 million new cases occurring annually. While infection rates in the U.S. hover around 15 to 20 percent, HSV-2 is highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly three in four women have contracted the virus, contributing significantly to the region’s HIV epidemic. The related virus, HSV-1 is primarily associated with oral lesions, but is a major cause of corneal blindness and infects around 60 percent of the world’s population. Notably, HSV-1 has been increasingly recognized as a cause of genital herpes in the United States and other developed countries. Most prior attempts to construct a herpes vaccine have focused on a glycoprotein called gD that is embedded in the virus’s outer envelope. This protein is required for the microbe to enter into and out of cells and to spread from cell-to-cell. gD also elicits a vigorous antibody response that many in the field believe is necessary to produce immunity. However, no gD-based vaccine has proven effective. “It was necessary to shake the field up and go another route,” says Betsy Herold, a virologist and infectious disease physician at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and co-study leader of the new research. As part of a separate ongoing study of the signaling pathway that the herpes virus uses to enter cells, Herold asked Jacobs’s lab to engineer a mutant with gD deleted. Though it was not necessarily obvious beforehand, “once we had this mutant in our hands,” Herold says, “it was a logical, scientifically driven hypothesis to say, ‘This strain would be 100 percent safe and might elicit a very different immune response than the gD subunit vaccines that have been tried.’” The hypothesis followed from the increasing understanding that, in addition to its critical role in viral entry, gD also has the ability to change the host immune response. In order to test the gD deletion virus as a vaccine, the researchers grew the virus in a cell line that expresses the HSV-1 version of gD. The HSV-2 virus, with gD deleted from its genome, grabbed the available HSV-1 gD proteins from the cell. When introduced to a mouse, HSV-2 was able to use the HSV-1 gD to enter the mouse’s cells. Once inside, HSV-2 replicated abundantly, but because it could not produce gD, future progeny were unable to infect new cells. According to Herold, infected cells then became “little factories for making viral proteins” that spurred the immune system to produce antibodies to HSV-2. The vaccine completely immunized two common strains of lab mice against HSV-2 when challenged with virus intravaginally or on the skin. In fact, no virus could be detected in vaginal washes four days post-challenge and even more importantly, no virus could be found in the nerve tissue, the site where HSV often hides in a latent form only to emerge later to cause disease. Protection against HSV-1, which shares considerable homology with HSV-2, was also demonstrated in both models. The vaccine produced no adverse health effects in a strain of mice with severely compromised immune systems, reflecting the vaccine’s overall safety. Blood serum passively transferred from immunized mice was found to protect wild-type mice, providing a powerful demonstration of the vaccine’s efficacy. “No one has ever shown for a skin disease that you can protect against infection with passive transfer,” Jacobs says. Another of the vaccine’s surprises is how it works. Many vaccines provoke the production of so-called neutralizing antibodies that directly bind and inactivate virus particles. The new vaccine, however, induces antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in which antibodies attach to a virus and flag it for destruction by immune system sentinels such as white blood cells. Further evidence that the vaccine triggers ADCC comes from the observation that they lost protection when the immune serum was transferred into mice in which FcϒR, a protein known to facilitate ADCC, is knocked out. As to why vaccines based on gD never worked, the team thinks that gD, which elicits a strong neutralizing immune response, may have actually been overwhelming the immune system to the extent that the immune system did not see other components of the virus or gD interfered with the ability to evoke ADCC. “Herpes is a pretty smart little virus,” Herold says. “It has multiple immune evasion strategies and this is one of many.” With gD knocked out, the immune system was able to react effectively to the virus’s less dominant components. The successful implementation of a vaccine based on ADCC could have profound implications for other infections. “It’s possible we could clone into this HSV vector pieces of other viruses, such as HIV, and maybe the immune system would produce the same types of ADCC antibodies for those viruses,” Herold says. The robust response generated by the vaccine, as well as its novel mechanism, has the researchers undertaking additional experiments in mice to determine whether it can be used to treat individuals already infected by HSV-1 and HSV-2. The next step for the researchers in producing a herpes vaccine for use in humans is demonstrating its efficacy and safety in an FDA-approved cell line. The researchers are also looking for an industry partner to help make large quantities of the vaccine for future clinical tests.
  23. The purpose of a therapeutic vaccine like Theravax is to present the immune system with a clear picture of the virus so it can produce antibodies against it. This is the same principle behind all therapeutic live or subunit vaccines. The Vitaherpavac Russian vaccine is a dry inactivated HSV culture that is also supposed to work the same way. The theory behind why the VZV / Chickenpox / Shingles vaccine works for herpes, is because HSV1, HSV2 and VZV (Chickenpox) share many structural proteins. I have also read studies that theorize people who have HSV1 are less likely to get HSV2, presumably due to the similarities between them. Smallpox was eradicated because Edward Jenner took scabs from cowpox which shared a similar structure to smallpox and rubbed them on open cuts to establish cross immunity. Considering all these approaches use the same principle,(present immune system with virus so it can kill and create antibodies against it) would it not be possible to take the fluids/scabs from your own HSV sore, wait a few hours/days for them to weaken or die, put it in a solution and inject yourself somewhere else on your body? This would essentially be on par with the the Vitaherpavac Russian dry inactivated HSV culture. Your own dead or dying HSV virions in suspension would probably illicit a stronger response than any subunit vaccine because it would have the entire viral structure for your immune system to respond to. What do you guys think of my idea? BTW, IF anybody attempts to monetize this idea via a kit/guide/book/paper/patent/design, etc.. I reserve the right for royalties! l1980in
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