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MsLucy

Cold sores & alzheimers?

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MsLucy

While watching the 6:00 local news tonight, I was surprised to learn that researchers had discovered a direct correlation between the incidence of Alzheimers and cold sores. Apparently, the nerves affected by oral herpes are related in some way to the part of the brain affected by Alzheimers, and those who suffer cold sores also stand a better chance of developing Alzheimers. Well, there's some cheerful news for you. The double whammy.

On the other hand, the announcer also went on to say that they're busy as little bees trying to find a vaccine for HSV1, not to prevent cold sores, but to lessen the odds of developing Alzheimers. I'm okay with that. If they develop a vaccine for a relatively minor disease in an attempt to prevent a truly devastating one, that's like killing two birds with one stone, right? Works for me. At least now they've got a little extra motivation.

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curecomingverysoon

Anything that will bring a vaccine for HSV is great thing. Where there's a vaccine for HSV 1 or 2, the vaccine for the second will follow.

I think that this is JUST the kick in the pants that researchers/donaters/pharmas/doctors/whatever need. Hopefully we can get the Alzheimer's charity folks onside to start pushing for a cure now as well. And the fact that our current antivirals will help them as well until that cure/vaccine is found is just an added boon. So really, I think this is a win-win for all involved.

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trigger

oh.. im so glad that i found this thread.. :)

By the way, does the vaccuine still works for people that has already contracted the HSV type 1 virus? Or can the vaccuine helps to prevent further OBs only and the Alzheimers virus?

I cant wait for the vaccuine to come out soon!... but i think they sure will take a long time to develop this vaccuine out :evil:

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GntiNh

Yes I knew about the connection :( , but as you say it might help bring an end to hs, so it's not all bad news.

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ntdc
While watching the 6:00 local news tonight, I was surprised to learn that researchers had discovered a direct correlation between the incidence of Alzheimers and cold sores. Apparently, the nerves affected by oral herpes are related in some way to the part of the brain affected by Alzheimers, and those who suffer cold sores also stand a better chance of developing Alzheimers. Well, there's some cheerful news for you. The double whammy.

On the other hand, the announcer also went on to say that they're busy as little bees trying to find a vaccine for HSV1, not to prevent cold sores, but to lessen the odds of developing Alzheimers. I'm okay with that. If they develop a vaccine for a relatively minor disease in an attempt to prevent a truly devastating one, that's like killing two birds with one stone, right? Works for me. At least now they've got a little extra motivation.

This has been suspected since the 1970s though there is still no conclusive evidence as to what role it plays. What they have found amounts to this...

Some people have a certain genetic predisposition to Alzheimer's disease. Amongst people carrying that genetic variation HSV-1 will increase the risk of developing the disease. However those with HSV-1 without the predisposition don't have a strong correlation between HSV-1 and Alzheimer's disease. Additionally those with the genetic predisposition and without HSV-1 can and do often develop Alzheimer's disease. As far as they know all it does is raise your risk, if you are already at risk. Recently scientists have found HSV-1 DNA in the plaque which builds up in the brains of Alzhimer's disease patients. This is not a smoking gun but it renewed interest in finding out what, if any, role HSV-1 plays in the disease.

A bit off topic but I want to point out sometihng. If an HSV-1 vaccine is ever avilable drug companies will no doubt use this connection to try to push it as an anti-alzheimer's vaccine, just as gardasil is pushed as preventing cervical cancer in women. This is a kind of marketing ploy and IMO is quite dangerous. In the case of gardasil there is simply no evidence that it prevents cancer. It prevents HPV which can lead to cervical cancer, this is well known. What is not known is whether the vaccine given to a girl in childhood will provide lifelong protection. What I believe is a possible unintended side effect is that women will be less vigliant about getting routine cancer screenings as they feel they are "protected" when in fact they may not be.

These kind of long term studies are difficult if not impossible to carry out. Consider to test if such a vaccine could actually prevent or reduce the risk Alzheimer's enough participants would actually have to be followed from childhood until they are old enough to develop the disease (your risk is basically nothing until you are past 70).

The odds are that by the time such a study could be conducted (if at all) there would already be a drug developed to treat or cure the condition of Alzhiemer's.

I hope an effective cure and/or vaccine for HSV-1/2 is eventually found but I don't think they should lie to get people to take it.

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ginnyp

I get somewhat irritated because I am 34 years old and considered TOO OLD to get the gardisil vaccine, yet I do not have the hpv strains that it prevents. So it could still help me. However, gardisil does NOT protect against all the hpv strains, thus cannot protect completely against getting cervical cancer, so the thought of people not getting screened is scary. I recently found out I have hpv 35. I hope when people get the gardisil vaccine that they are explained to that it only can prevent 4 types of hpv, and there are 40 sexually transmitted types out there!

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ntdc
I get somewhat irritated because I am 34 years old and considered TOO OLD to get the gardisil vaccine, yet I do not have the hpv strains that it prevents. So it could still help me. However, gardisil does NOT protect against all the hpv strains, thus cannot protect completely against getting cervical cancer, so the thought of people not getting screened is scary. I recently found out I have hpv 35. I hope when people get the gardisil vaccine that they are explained to that it only can prevent 4 types of hpv, and there are 40 sexually transmitted types out there!

The researchers are working on another vaccine now to cover more strains

they're are many types of HPV over time they hope to roll out

vaccines against most of them. In 2007 the people running the mens trial for gardasil told me the 2nd vaccine is in the works and they hope to have it to early trials in a few years.

Remember no one knows if the vaccine can deliver life-long protection they only know it offers protection for 3yrs all women should continue regular screenings.

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