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BEAUTY777

Herpes and the army

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BEAUTY777

I want to join the army but im not sure if they will let me if i have herpes so if anyone knows the answer to this please please let me know

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Herpes Awareness

I've heard 'visible lesions' at medical exam time on entry will disqualify you, but it's OK to catch it after you get in, as it were. Visible lesions of course could be a sign of lots of infective diseases, so they are just being careful. I have seen the actual US Army guidelines also, this is not just hearsay, but these things can also be subject to change over time.

If you desperately want to be accepted, do not disclose your status to them on entry, especially if you have no visible signs at the time of med exam -- perhaps take Valtrex for a few days beforehand and avoid outbreak triggers leading up to the exam also.

There is a question in my mind over whether suffering from HSV-1 or HSV-2 either genitally or orally will make much of a difference to your ability to serve, especially in combat or deployment conditions. Could be yes or no, and something to think about. e.g. high ambient heat can be enough to cause outbreaks, and being in difficult climates may be enough to trigger an o/b and make you less effective in an active combat position.

My view is that if the govt and medical fraternity trivialise this disease and don't care who catches it and aren't into health protection in the community, I really don't care if the Army has high standards or not when it comes to sufferers applying for entry -- if govt was doing its job, there would be far fewer cases of this disease in circulation.

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BEAUTY777

so are you saying you dont want me to try cause you dont think the army should accept people with my condition???

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Sophie D.

Hi,

I do not know the answer for sure, but I seriously doubt that the army cares if you have HSV.

about 75% of the population has coldsores so... they would have to really screen a lot of people out.

And 25% of the population has "gential" herpes.

I definitely do not recommend lying about anything to get into the army. If you do lie to get in, it could put your career and/or retirement $$$ at risk, not to mention that I am sure they could kick you out for lying if they wanted to.

Why not just call a recruitment office and ask? Don't give your name or anything.

Call one that is in your area if you want to be sure that they will not know it was you.

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Herpes Awareness
Hi,

I do not know the answer for sure, but I seriously doubt that the army cares if you have HSV.

about 75% of the population has coldsores so... they would have to really screen a lot of people out.

And 25% of the population has "genital" herpes.

I definitely do not recommend lying about anything to get into the army. If you do lie to get in, it could put your career and/or retirement $$$ at risk, not to mention that I am sure they could kick you out for lying if they wanted to.

Why not just call a recruitment office and ask? Don't give your name or anything.

Call one that is in your area if you want to be sure that they will not know it was you.

I wouldn't worry about lying to 'em if you get away with it -- once you're in, how would they know when you caught it? As long as you don't have visible lesions at exam time. I recently looked at the army medical questionnaire (in a different country) and realised they have no ability to check your previous medical history out, it all depends what boxes you tick. A doctor friend of mine confirmed this, and he's worked with the military for 30 years. I'd lie like a politician if I had to, as long as it's stuff I think I won't be caught out in. The only issue is if it will affect you in combat duty, assuming you are thinking of applying for combat duty. e.g. asthma used to be an ineligible disease, then they got so desperate to recruit that they've completely changed the eligibility, and try to assess just how bad your asthma is.

Just because 25% of the ppn has GHSV doesn't mean they won't rule you out -- traditionally you have to be reasonably fit to get in to the armed forces, fitter than the average. High blood pressure can rule you out, asthma, etc, and these things are all common in the general ppn at various ages. GHSV could be seen as detrimental in combat situations to your concentration and wellbeing. As I noted, apparently one criterion at medical exam time is no visible genital lesions -- simple as that.

The other thing, I recently called army recruitment with a similar question, but in this country they ID you on every phone call -- you can't ask 'anonymous' questions because they insist on knowing your identity at the outset. If you won't provide it, they won't tell you anything. If you say you're calling for a relative, they say get the relative to call and we'll tell them. So depends on how desperate the US Army is for a continuous supply of cannon fodder as to how tough they are even when making an enquiry. (I suppose you could make up a completely false name and address, etc, but they ask a lot of questions in advance. Another way is to get a friend or relative to call up claiming to want to join and that they have GHSV to try to get a ruling, and they supply all their details as a sacrificial guinea pig.)

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Doctobe

My view is that if the govt and medical fraternity trivialise this disease and don't care who catches it and aren't into health protection in the community, I really don't care if the Army has high standards or not when it comes to sufferers applying for entry -- if govt was doing its job, there would be far fewer cases of this disease in circulation.

This is an absurd statment. It shows a lack of understanding reagading the ubiquitous nature of hepres virus and how little to nothign can be done to treat or prevent its incidence and prevalence among the population.

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Flicken

Doctobe

This is an absurd statment. It shows a lack of understanding reagading the ubiquitous nature of hepres virus and how little to nothign can be done to treat or prevent its incidence and prevalence among the population.

I disagree, Doctobe. It's not absurd at all. Here is how the government could contribute more:

- Mandate that more informative/in-depth sexual education curriculums be taught to high school students, and make the students take multiple choice tests to see how well they know the symptoms of the different stds (or lack thereof, as many can be asyptomatic yet present)

- Make hsv blood testing a routine part of an std screening. About 1% of the doctors (of the hundreds of people I've talked to on this board) actually performed an hsv test unless they saw physical manifestations of the disease. As demonstrated by the 2004 nationwide random testing studies for hsv (with representative population samples), 90% of people who had herpes (one out of four) had NO IDEA they had herpes. This is why it is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY that herpes blood testing should be mandatory during your regular routine screen. Government could pass such a law, or...they could continue letting us spread this epedimic, and allow 90% of the 1/4 to live their life unaware that their sexual acts may very well be spreading the disease.

- The government needs to provide much more funding to herpes research. UF's Dr. Bloom received a 400K grant that expired in 2008. Private contributions and some contributions by medical groups help to keep the research going, but we need the government's help. Those with herpes are 9 times more likely to contract HIV than those without herpes, so it is IMPERATIVE that the government steps in to help fund promising research by prestigious universities including Harvard, Duke, and the UF.

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Doctobe
I disagree, Doctobe. It's not absurd at all. Here is how the government could contribute more:

- Mandate that more informative/in-depth sexual education curriculums be taught to high school students, and make the students take multiple choice tests to see how well they know the symptoms of the different stds (or lack thereof, as many can be asyptomatic yet present)

- Make hsv blood testing a routine part of an std screening. About 1% of the doctors (of the hundreds of people I've talked to on this board) actually performed an hsv test unless they saw physical manifestations of the disease. As demonstrated by the 2004 nationwide random testing studies for hsv (with representative population samples), 90% of people who had herpes (one out of four) had NO IDEA they had herpes. This is why it is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY that herpes blood testing should be mandatory during your regular routine screen. Government could pass such a law, or...they could continue letting us spread this epedimic, and allow 90% of the 1/4 to live their life unaware that their sexual acts may very well be spreading the disease.

- The government needs to provide much more funding to herpes research. UF's Dr. Bloom received a 400K grant that expired in 2008. Private contributions and some contributions by medical groups help to keep the research going, but we need the government's help. Those with herpes are 9 times more likely to contract HIV than those without herpes, so it is IMPERATIVE that the government steps in to help fund promising research by prestigious universities including Harvard, Duke, and the UF.

Steps toward education are the best idea, at the end of the day governemts do not have any power, it is the poeple who ultimately make a choice to act a certain way with or without information....

Governments need to step out of the way imo. For every "good intention" we can think of that we could ask government to provide it, but that also means that we need to fork over our money through taxes. Taxes are incredibly poorly managed and governments give the lowest return for the amount of money they collect. Research and science is best left in the hands of the people without government intervention. Government will only corrupt science with politics. The most successful philanthropic initiatives and public health initiatives have been taken on by the private sector, through donations, and volunteerism, ie Gates foundation, Make a wish foundation, the list is endless. If we really want something to happen then setting up a private, not-for-profit foundation would be the best way by far to tackle the problem IMO.

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Flicken
Steps toward education are the best idea, at the end of the day governemts do not have any power, it is the poeple who ultimately make a choice to act a certain way with or without information....

Governments need to step out of the way imo. For every "good intention" we can think of that we could ask government to provide it, but that also means that we need to fork over our money through taxes. Taxes are incredibly poorly managed and governments give the lowest return for the amount of money they collect. Research and science is best left in the hands of the people without government intervention. Government will only corrupt science with politics. The most successful philanthropic initiatives and public health initiatives have been taken on by the private sector, through donations, and volunteerism, ie Gates foundation, Make a wish foundation, the list is endless. If we really want something to happen then setting up a private, not-for-profit foundation would be the best way by far to tackle the problem IMO.

To-date, there have been no non-for-profit charitable organizations to raise awareness and donations for herpes research. Blueskies, an active user on this message board (I won't give out this user's real name here), is far along in the process of starting the first of these organizations. It's called Protecting Future Generations. The nfp doesn't just encompass herpes but other incurable diseases as well, as we all have to fight the fight together. Another herpes-coldsores member and myself are going to be serving as board members. There is information about the organization in some threads around the h-c message board. I am impressed with all of Blueskies' hard work, and thrilled that this nfp is moving forward. It will be wonderful to have an nfp that we can all get behind to help educate the public, and to help raise necessary funding for better treatment, a vaccine, and A CURE!

I look forward to the day (and it will be soon) that I don't have to be shunned for having this disease...the day that others will react will compassion instead of disgust when I tell them, the day that others will react with a hug instead of shock, and the day that I don't have to have to explain myself, but rather others will already be educated enough to hold an informed conversation about the disease...when we have reached that level of understanding and awareness, future generations may be better protected and a cure may well be within our reach.

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tohealth
Governments need to step out of the way imo. For every "good intention" we can think of that we could ask government to provide it, but that also means that we need to fork over our money through taxes. Taxes are incredibly poorly managed and governments give the lowest return for the amount of money they collect. Research and science is best left in the hands of the people without government intervention.

This kind of rhetoric has done nothing for a single country--or the world economies. Governments get the lowest return on the money? Are you including regulated utilities??? Are you suggesting that "the markets" would of their own good will build teaching hospitals and trauma centers??? Should we perhaps dismantle childhood vaccination programs and let "the markets" take care of it--Merck, Pfizer, and J&J??? Are you suggesting that all public education--like that in China and India and Scandinavia and Japan and even Cuba--should the government "step out of the way" and let "the markets" take care of education--can you name ONE country where this is successful on any scale??? If government is so poor at everything, why not let "the markets" take care of all things military related??? Try this: ask Russia if they need less government. Heck--ask the US. Those little HIV and TB epidemics enswathing their prison system; the lack of basic potable water for many citizens and consequent health deteriorations--rising infant mortality and falling life expectancies; sinking submarines--it's a mess.

This sounds like a stereotypical male adolescent-minded Ayn Rand mesmerized market worshipper romanticizing about the glory of free markets --a glory that has never existed, and never will. Active government is absolutely required in any market and certainly in the sciences and R&D. How else would you get incentives for stem cell research or vaccinations that are high risk and have long payback periods for return on investments and don't bring in the big bucks of something like statin drugs for big pharma??? The drug industry would never bother with anything too long term and certainly not vaccinating kids without a mandate or insurance policy from government, and we're better for it. The government is actually CREATING the market in this way. How much cancer research do you actually think would happen without companies giving money CHARITABLY as encouraged by the government. That money would dry up without the GOVERNMENT incentivizing charitable donations. There is not a drop of evidence that any company would give away anything without the government first incentivizing it. In fact, they would be SUED by their shareholders if they DID. Do you still want the government to "step out of the way"?

Government will only corrupt science with politics. The most successful philanthropic initiatives and public health initiatives have been taken on by the private sector, through donations, and volunteerism, ie Gates foundation, Make a wish foundation, the list is endless. If we really want something to happen then setting up a private, not-for-profit foundation would be the best way by far to tackle the problem IMO.

Science is already political and it's already corrupt. And those foundations get their money solely because of government incentives. The idea that the laboratory is some pure arena of intellect is a joke: some of the most self-interested and political people are in academia doing R&D. Watson and Crick didn't even actually discover the double helix/deoxyribonucleic acid structure for which they are so famously known and received the Nobel Prize--a female scientist did who at the time was too sick to bother with claiming it. It's fairly well known in the science world. Some of the most greedy corrupt and political people are running the world's biggest churches and religions--I think your position is a naive one. Government is no more "corrupt" than the money that the big drug companies flood into their world is. These are your lovely "market" folks at work, "buying" and "selling" influence. How about those "market forces." How about the SEC/IRS/criminal justice system/antitrust law "stepping out of the way" of that--see where it gets you. You see where world economies are now WITH it. WITHOUT it I can't even imagine. Yes I can---RUSSIA! Miserable land of the underworld.

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Doctobe

you managed to make an argument against mine, and also against your own, read between the very lines you wrote. It sounds like you have the expectation of uncorrupted governments and money... perfect world. My argument is that people in their own self interest and good intentions combined can come out more productive then a command economy...

We could honestly debate this until we are blue in the face and it would certainly be great conversation, although I apologise I do not hav the time. I yield to your argument.

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Doctobe
To-date, there have been no non-for-profit charitable organizations to raise awareness and donations for herpes research. Blueskies, an active user on this message board (I won't give out this user's real name here), is far along in the process of starting the first of these organizations. It's called Protecting Future Generations. The nfp doesn't just encompass herpes but other incurable diseases as well, as we all have to fight the fight together. Another herpes-coldsores member and myself are going to be serving as board members. There is information about the organization in some threads around the h-c message board. I am impressed with all of Blueskies' hard work, and thrilled that this nfp is moving forward. It will be wonderful to have an nfp that we can all get behind to help educate the public, and to help raise necessary funding for better treatment, a vaccine, and A CURE!

I look forward to the day (and it will be soon) that I don't have to be shunned for having this disease...the day that others will react will compassion instead of disgust when I tell them, the day that others will react with a hug instead of shock, and the day that I don't have to have to explain myself, but rather others will already be educated enough to hold an informed conversation about the disease...when we have reached that level of understanding and awareness, future generations may be better protected and a cure may well be within our reach.

That's great, congrats! Hopefully more can be achieved in ways of education, it is the only way to a better future.

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motorcyclerider

I served 4 years active in the ARMY from 1995-99. I didnt have this when I was in but I will say. They only did the battery of normal blood tests- meaning everything your primary care physician would do as well as an AIDS test for obvious reasons. If you have a life threatening disease that at the time people were only expected to live 10 years after having full blown AIDS then they wont let you serve- plus as we all know its a bloodborn desease. If you get cut or maimed in combat anyone that comes in contact with your wounds are at high risk for catching a possible death sentence.

Herpes testing was never ever even brought up. I did 4 years and never was I tested for it so relax about that. Afetr your entrance medical to get in unless you become sick with something they ony test your blood once a year at your mandatory yearly physical or if you get deployed- again HSV testing I never heard of. Their main concern is for Hepatitis and the other mainstream bad things. Best wishes on your possible service.

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RealisticGal
I disagree, Doctobe. It's not absurd at all. Here is how the government could contribute more:

- Make hsv blood testing a routine part of an std screening. About 1% of the doctors (of the hundreds of people I've talked to on this board) actually performed an hsv test unless they saw physical manifestations of the disease. As demonstrated by the 2004 nationwide random testing studies for hsv (with representative population samples), 90% of people who had herpes (one out of four) had NO IDEA they had herpes. This is why it is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY that herpes blood testing should be mandatory during your regular routine screen. Government could pass such a law, or...they could continue letting us spread this epedimic, and allow 90% of the 1/4 to live their life unaware that their sexual acts may very well be spreading the disease.

The problem with mandatory blood testing is that the current level of technology for herpes serology is not very advanced. It is not yet very reliable. There are far too many false positives (and negatives).

This sort of unreliable information could cause a great deal of emotional turmoil for untold numbers of folks who wrongly would be told they have herpes, while also making some with false negative results think they are clear (to go out and continue passing herpes along).

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Herpes Awareness

I believe the only problem with HSV-2 and the army intake medicals if you are having an active florid outbreak at the time of the medical -- another poster in the past has indicated, and pasted in standing rules, that simply say 'lesioning on the genitals' will exclude you. So hence my initial post to avoid actual visible outbreaks before a medical. The same poster also said that once you're in, if it comes up later (e.g. active lesioning at an annual medical), you stay, they don't kick you out either.

I very much doubt they do IgG-specific tests for HSV-2, because the army doctors are as ill-advised and ill-trained as all the other doctors on the matter.

If you read about the antics on the Australian HMAS Success you would probably see why, lol. just google the ship name.

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Herpes Awareness
This is an absurd statment. It shows a lack of understanding reagading the ubiquitous nature of hepres virus and how little to nothign can be done to treat or prevent its incidence and prevalence among the population.

I also disagree, as per Flicken's later remarks.

In fact, I am now working with the Oz Dept of Health to get these very things put in to the school curriculum, the screening and preventative counselling by GPs as a mandatory part of their practice and medical training also.

This could also extend to preventing HSV-1 more, for what it's worth -- the AHMF recently put together some community service ads on TV on that topic, about sharing glasses, etc.

State govts need to put more accurate and specific info and warnings into high school education also.

I'm please to say that my recommendations have at least partially gone into the new Oz national STI prevention strategy for 2010 -- now available on the web -- but I still have many points of disagreement with the MACBBVS here, and am dealing with those points right now -- I've found I really have to lean in and push with these Canberra bureaucrats to make a difference, and am doing that with renewed vigour starting just a month ago, after 4 years of occasional lobbying. The way to do it is to find out who the medical advisory committee people are, and if they are not performing, you have to go after their secretariat and explain why they are wrong, complain to the Deptmental Secretary (right at the top of the dept) and complain to the Minister. It's reached a point with me where I'm not taking any more crap and excuses from them -- I gave them time to come up with a revised second national strategy, and they still faffed it up -- so the gloves are off for the next few months.

The Fed govt is going to force docs and the Divisions of General Practice to do much more preventatively, anyhow, even without my further feedback -- I'm pleased to say that this was my suggestion after getting a 1 hour interview with them in the review process for the last national strategy.

I'm disappointed that doctobe is so laissez-faire about GHSV-2 in particular and looking at systematic ways of dealing with community disease as a public health issue, using mandatory screening and preventative health measures determined by govts -- shows a lack of awareness of the role of govt regrettably just like so many doctors. And I'm a doc to be now myself as well.

Although Canada is in the British Commonwealth, it seems doctobe has been taking laissez-faire lessons from his free market doctrinaire friends over the border.

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AF Vet

Correction to 'Herpes Awareness'

I'd lie like a politician if I had to, as long as it's stuff I think I won't be caught out in. The only issue is if it will affect you in combat duty, assuming you are thinking of applying for combat duty. e.g. asthma used to be an ineligible disease, then they got so desperate to recruit that they've completely changed the eligibility, and try to assess just how bad your asthma is.

I'm a veteran of the US Air Force... as you can probably gather from my name.... and I think I've talked to you Beauty... In any event.... I would talk to A recruiter... Heck, call one in another city. I wouldn't necessarily DISCLOSE... but I wouldn't LIE either... Lieing can and will cost you your career if they find out. I've seen it happen. And Asthma will keep you OUT of the military now days...

The reason why is your not World Wide Qualified. If you have an attack and are unable to get to medical facilities in time you will die. Most field hospitals cater to trauma related injuries... those commonly found on a battle field. The pharmacy will stock common meds... motrin being a favorite of the military... but not things like an Albuteral inhaler, or bee sting kits (another thing that will keep you out is a bee alergy).

I do not believe you will be excluded because of herpes simply because its not life threatening, where the examples of Asthma and bee alergies are. But... as I suggested... call a recruiter in another city and ask.

Good luck!

~J

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Herpes Awareness

Correction to AF Vet?

I'm a veteran of the US Air Force... as you can probably gather from my name.... and I think I've talked to you Beauty... In any event.... I would talk to A recruiter... Heck, call one in another city. I wouldn't necessarily DISCLOSE... but I wouldn't LIE either... Lieing can and will cost you your career if they find out. I've seen it happen. And Asthma will keep you OUT of the military now days...

The reason why is your not World Wide Qualified. If you have an attack and are unable to get to medical facilities in time you will die. Most field hospitals cater to trauma related injuries... those commonly found on a battle field. The pharmacy will stock common meds... motrin being a favorite of the military... but not things like an Albuteral inhaler, or bee sting kits (another thing that will keep you out is a bee alergy).

I do not believe you will be excluded because of herpes simply because its not life threatening, where the examples of Asthma and bee alergies are. But... as I suggested... call a recruiter in another city and ask.

Good luck!

~J

Not sure what I've said that is being 'corrected' here. Especially since AF Vet is worried about an 'attack' of a disease that doesn't have attacks per se. Not in an allergenic or life-threatening sense anyhow. Plus plenty of recruits would test +ve for HSV-1 if they were ever tested, which they're not.

The point about not LYING but not DISCLOSING is kind of a paraphrase of what I've said already, but unfortunately you probably WILL be required to LIE on your health info sheet as they have very comprehensive lists of known diseases for you to fill out -- e.g. HSV-2 will appear on the sheet. Knowing that many people infected with HSV genuinely don't know they have it, you can say 'No' and sign off on it and keep it to yourself -- because you never realised you had it as you were asymptomatic, weren't you! How could you be expected to know? They will probably never do an IgG test on you, ever. So you ARE LYING to them and not DISCLOSING, but so what? I've checked the Oz Defence medical checklists and HSV-2 appears there, as does HPV and so on -- listed as genital herpes and genital warts respectively, which is kind of a slightly different thing than naming the exact viruses, but they ask you anyway. And this was at least 8 pages of medical history for you to fill out and submit back to them. OK, if you were absolutely honest and listed it (ticked the box) they might pass you anyhow, but then again, they might not.

Apparently US health checks at recruitment time -- according to another poster here -- look for active genital lesions which will disqualify you regardless of what caused them -- it's just the physical presentation that is the problem. Hence you don't want to be showing up with any major physical genital signs.

Further, previous history of asthma in the Australian military will not necessarily keep you OUT these days, as an incidental aside -- they've actually relaxed it due to recruitment issues, and you can pass with some history of childhood asthma if you are currently under control without meds, haven't had an attack for years, etc -- they've nuanced it quite a lot based on medical info and studies, it used to be a blanket knockback with any history of childhood asthma once. I got this from a GP in my local practice who does current ADF assessments as a sideline.

The thing is, the military apparently cannot obtain copies of previous medical history as that is a professional and protected confidence with you and your doctor -- when I asked the same GP about Defence getting my records, he said 'I'd like to see them try!' -- and he does assessments for the military directly! So in the Oz system, it all hinges on what you disclose on the sheet and what they can find out in a pretty basic medical exam with their own docs. Just try to keep fit and in good health and watch your weight, and it should take care of itself.

Regarding talking to recruiters in another town, I don't know how the US system works, but in Australia the recruiters won't talk to you over the phone until they've got your exact identity -- name, address, etc and they look you up to see if you've ever spoken to them before. You can't ask 'innocent questions' until you've been verified, and if you say you're calling for a friend they say get the friend to call up and do the whole ID check thing all over again. The US system might be different, but let's face it, they're pretty desperate to get people to patrol in Afghanistan and Iraq and potentially get blown up. See how you go, YMMV.

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AF Vet

When I was saying 'attack' I was talking about Asthma... an Asthma Attack... which if bad enough is life threatening. I'm an asthmatic and that's what eventually got me medically discharged from the Air Force. I'd had it as a child and it went away, which sometimes happens. Later it returned. The Air Force did extensive testing when I went through basic to make sure I didn't have asthma at that time, and good thing they did. If they hadn't, because I had childhood asthma, they would have given me a dishonerable discharge on the grounds that I'd lied about not having asthma. As it is I have a medical/honerable discharge.

that's all I was saying.

Good luck Beauty

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Herpes Awareness
If they hadn't, because I had childhood asthma, they would have given me a dishonerable discharge on the grounds that I'd lied about not having asthma. As it is I have a medical/honerable discharge.

fair enough, but surely they don't have access to your childhood medical records? so the only way they would find out about childhood asthma is if you told them about it.

I think lying about childhood asthma where it can recur in action in adulthood is a really risk thing too, yes, and that's why they screen out asthmatics -- we are talking about HSV, and the question I had way back in the piece was whether having HSV would compromise you in a combat position or otherwise on deployment. Probably the best thing you could do is ask innocent questions anonymously of recruitment people, but anonymous questions might get incomplete, dishonest or inaccurate answers that are not binding. Nonetheless I understand US recruiters in this day and age get bonuses for everyone they recruit and are willing to waive quite a few obstacles in their zeal.

I think the ADF relaxed some of their intake requirements here in order to get the numbers up -- childhood asthma was slightly less of a problem, they started worrying less about weight and fitness, etc -- altho they've had to discharge a few members for 'obesity' lately despite their supposed addiction to fitness and training.

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gotitsowhat

I've asked

Several months ago, in response to a similar question on the board, I went to the local military recruiter here in Norwalk, California, USA. (It was a place for Army, Navy and Air Force). The recruiter there said that it would not be necessary to exclude you if you were not having an active outbreak. They do not care if you have herpes but they are not allowed to accept you if, during the exam, you are found to have an active lesion on your genitals.

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CoriBelle

Hiya

I want to join the army but im not sure if they will let me if i have herpes so if anyone knows the answer to this please please let me know

A friend of mine I served with in the Navy had ghsv2 from 17 on, she disclosed this and wasn't held back from joining.. She was fully deployable and had no restrictions on what rate she chose, we were both Corpsman:)... Work it out girl:)

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CoriBelle

Hi:)

Hi Beauty..

I don't believe this will cause you to become disqualified. While in the Navy, a good friend of mine had Herpes from 17 on. She disclosed this to her recruiter, then again @ MEPS while processing and she went through just fine & had a successful career without limitation because of hsv.

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    • blurneworder
      Breakouts meaning zits? My mouth is also red, especially on the edges. I keep getting zits around my mouth and my top lip is constantly chapped. i too am starting to get the nerve pain in the butt. i also have redness on the penis and white peeing skin. what else could affect those areas other than herpes? What coincidentally affects the mouth, penis, and anus after sex that is not herpes?
    • justfine622
      Hey Littleoscar,   Welcome. Did you just decide to completely avoid the search? Was it a mental block, the severity of the symptoms, or some combination?
    • Mbtb
      My boyfriend at the time had a sore on his groin that looked like an ingrown hair. He slept with a girl who got hsv2 from another guy. The other guy has only had the one outbreak like me. The girl just recently had her second outbreak. I got bloodwork done about a month and half after the sore appeared. This guy I just disclosed to, how do I fix this?
    • Joey1987
      Awesome! So glad to hear it. If this protocol from Biogetica fails, that is going to be my next option. SO far Im on my second month with no OBs and no antivirals, which is huge for me. I also dont like to use the word "cured" but its definitely helping!
    • Joey1987
      Well I have received their protocol for the last 2 months, wired them money via paypal, and they have always sent me the products. And Im on my second month no OBs and no antivirals....so something is obviously working. Did it "cure me? I doubt it. But it has definitely helped!
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