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Guest Seatortuga

What books are you reading?

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Guest Seatortuga

I'll start off: I just finished God is not great by Christopher Hitchens, which is a great read for anyone who questions the existence of God(Don't we ALL). Matter of fact, if you really believe in God, you should read that book, it was quite the eye opener.

I started on The City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre recently and this is a book about the people that live in Calcutta. Reading these types of books dwarfs all of the problems any American could dream of running into (Including have herpes ;)). Makes you appreciate the shoes on your feet and the clean glass of water in your hand!

Anyway,now it's your turn to share with the class :)

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catiesmom

Hmm maybe i'm superficial! :) I've been reading Nora Roberts, but i'm getting bored of her, so i'm getting ready to branch out into some paranormal mysteries. We have a fabulous new small bookstore near our house, and i managed to snag a signed copy of the one that's been clawing at me for weeks now.

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LoyalPaw

Books!

Right now I'm in the middle of both Bram Stoker's Dracula and a really old copy of Idylls of the King.

I just realized that most of the books I read are reference, or books on particular subjects, with no storyline.

...back to the used book store.

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GntiNh

The best book I've read recently was The Shack, Willam Paul Young, it's about someone's faith in God and therefore themselves. Very good.

The rest of the stuff has been technical (for voluntary work I do), but off to the library later to get some bedtime reading.

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Butterfly of the Moment

One of my favorite books is Kaffir Boy, it opened my eyes to how lucky I am to be an American and not have to fight for food or education...I know it takes place in the 70s but the poverty people still live in still exists. Lately, I've only been reading books that are light and fictional, I enjoy reading fantasy and vampire books...it takes me away.

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TheOriginalameera

I have decided that I am going to re-read the harrpy potter series next week b4 I go see the new movie. I need to read some historical fiction or something so I can learn about our history. I have no interest in history but like to absorb random facts...any suggestions??

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Butterfly of the Moment
I have decided that I am going to re-read the harrpy potter series next week b4 I go see the new movie. I need to read some historical fiction or something so I can learn about our history. I have no interest in history but like to absorb random facts...any suggestions??

I love historical fiction like The Other Boleyn Girl by Phillipa Gregory. I know it's not american history but it gives you a feel for what life was like for the rich during the Tudor reign. It's a great book that sucks you in.

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Guest Seatortuga

Seepage, I'm not much of a history reader. If it was a history book, I would read something that had to do with the wars, such as World War I and II, or the civil war. I once read a book about St. Patrick as well, but that was in grade school.

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trying

been reading obscene amounts of david foster wallace's non-fiction, also just read After Dark by murakami, which was okay, and am currently reading Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World, also by Murakami, which is so far much better.

Seatortuga I like Hitchens a lot, hadn't heard of that book though. Placed a hold on it at the local library, thanks for the suggestion

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gotitsowhat

Summer reads

I have been re-reading a lot of short stories by Harlan Ellison, one of the world's greatest writers (he was nominated for a Nobel last year). I was lucky enough to meet Harlan Ellison last year after sending him a fan letter. He invited me to eat dinner with him, his wife, his agent and some friends--at Pink's Hot Dog Stand on Melrose Avenue here in Los Angeles. Then we went to see the recent documentary made about him and his work: Dreams With Sharp Teeth. A great writer, great flick and great evening.

I am also about to re-read a Stephen King novel. With any luck, maybe I can meet Stephen King someday so I can tell him how many times he (and Ellison) have saved my life and my sanity.

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Riseaboveit

Summer Reads

What a great question. Isn't it nice to write about something positive? Amen to that!

OK, here goes.

A dear friend of mine died in June, the day before my birthday. I was having trouble dealing with it until I picked up Elizabeth Kubler-Ross's book "Death and Life After Death." It would be a great book for you to read since you read "God is not Great!" It will give you balance. I am not a religious nut, in fact I am a lapsed Catholic, with many misgivings about organized religion. But this book helped me so much. I have passed it along to others and they are loving it. I followed that with "On Grief and Grieving" also by EKR.

Just so you won't think I am the most depressing person on this thread, I am also reading "Back to the Garden" by Pete Fornatalli, a wonderful book about Woodstock. Pete does a weekly radio show called Mixed Bag on most Public Radio stations and he is delightful. What he doesn't know about Rock n' Roll doesn't exist. The book is a series of interviews with people that were there. Actually, whoever said they should read about history, this is terrific because it is about our 60's cultural history. Also "Boom!" by Tom Brokaw is an excellent look at the 60's.

I can also recommend the following books that I have read in the recent past. I do a lot more reading during the summer for some reason, so some of these books I read last summer and the summer before.

"Water for Elephants" - I could not put this book down when I read it and I am not a great reader. I should read it again before they do the movie version.

"I Feel Bad About My Neck" by Nora Ephron - hilarious!

"Shicksa Goddess," and "Elements of Style" by Wendy Wasserstein. LOVE HER! All three of these books are short, sassy, funny books to read.

"Chosen by a Horse" by Susan Richards and "Pack of Two" (I can't remember the author). If you love animals they are wonderful.

Thanks for your suggestions, I have a few more to finish, but I will keep those in mind.

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Guest Seatortuga

I am compiling a freakin sweet list of books to read just from this thread. If I could sit about and read all day, I would. Luckily, I have enough books in mind to keep me out of trouble for a long time to come!

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Shayna

Riseaboveit, Oh how I Loved reading "Water for elephants"! That's was such a fun read, I didn't want it to end.

Just finished "Suite Francaise" (sp?), and re-read "The good earth" by Pearl Buck.

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vtamnl

I just finished reading Copper Sun by Sharon M. Draper

It had me crying from beginning to end. It's an amazing book about slavery. I definitely recommend it.

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trying

Just finished Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of The World by Murakami, it was great. I think probably my favorite of his books tied with Kafka on the Shore.

Just started Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow. I realized upon starting it that I tried to read this a couple years ago, but only got about 20 pages in. And I'm beginning to remember why ... his writing is pretty dense, it really slows you down.

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ntdc

"Catching the wolf of wall street" jordan belfort (sequel to The wolf of wall street" )

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gotitsowhat

I am re-reading

The Secret Life of Plants.

I read it many years ago and it completely changed my view of plants and nature. What a fascinating read.

I am reading it again now because I teach horticulture and I plan on giving this book to some of my students to read.

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Shayna

Oh man...Costco books are tempting! I'm embarrassed to admit I just bought "behind the mask" life of Micheal Jackson.

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alittlenothing
One of my favorite books is Kaffir Boy, it opened my eyes to how lucky I am to be an American and not have to fight for food or education...I know it takes place in the 70s but the poverty people still live in still exists. Lately, I've only been reading books that are light and fictional, I enjoy reading fantasy and vampire books...it takes me away.

Kaffir Boy is amazing. I read it when I was eleven and it's still lodged in my brain to this day.

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alittlenothing
I have decided that I am going to re-read the harrpy potter series next week b4 I go see the new movie. I need to read some historical fiction or something so I can learn about our history. I have no interest in history but like to absorb random facts...any suggestions??

Wickett's Remedy by Myla Goldberg is a really neat book, set in Boston during the 1918 flu epidemic.

The Cartoon History of the United States is really good, surprisingly informative given that it is in cartoon form! Non-fiction but a really easy read.

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Lookonthesunnyside

love reading!

I have been told by numerous people that A Fine Balance is an amazing book although I have not read it yet. Some of my personal faves are:

- Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden (Love this book)

- Guns, Germs and Steel -Jared Diamond (Educational)

- Life of Pi - Yann Martel

- The Glass Castle - Jeanette Walls

- Lullabies for Little Criminals - Heather O'Neill (Easy read but soo good)

- White Oleander - Janet Fitch

- Sweetness in the Belly - Camilla Gibb

- 1984 - George Orwell

- The Rent Tent - Anita Diamant (Sad but amazing)

- The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold (Easy read, sad but awesome)

For easy girly reads I recommend any Marianne Keys (but especially Sushi For Beginners), or Summer Sisters by Judy Blume.

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alittlenothing

Right now I'm reading Homage to Catalonia to George Orwell. I keep getting distracted by other books, though! I've been reading it on and off for two months.

Can anyone recommend any good books by modern authors? And any books by Asian authors--I've liked everything I've read by the two Murakamis, Banana Yoshimoto and Yukia Mishima so far. And has anyone read The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, and how'd you like it?

Favorite books EVER:

Bee Season by Myla Goldberg, about a Jewish family's whole dynamic being thrown off when the under-achieving youngest daughter wins the school spelling bee. I guess that sounds kind of boring but it's a detailed portrait of a horribly dysfunctional family and the characters get up to some pretty interesting things throughout the course of the book.

Ressurrection by Leo Tolstoy. A boy seduces his family's young maid and basically ruins her life as a result. He encounters her again years later and much of the book is him dealing with his guilt and remorse and attempting to navigate the Russian legal system in order to help her.

I can't speak for War and Peace but of course Anne Karenina is fantastic, though I don't think I'd have the patience to get through the..what was it, 800+ pages?..now that I lack the motivation of eight hours a day of dull high school classes! Definitely worth it, though.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez is my absolute favorite author. I'm not much for short stories but I've loved the novels of his that I've read: 100 Years of Solitude, The General in His Labyrinth and Love in the Time of Cholera. Love in the Time of Cholera is amazing, probably my favorite book of all time. He is simply an amazing author and the only one I would confidently lump in with all the old literary masters.

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami. This book grabs hold of you, starts out ordinary but becomes slowly more bizarre, captivating and eventually somewhat terrifying.

Goodnight, Mr. Tom..I read this in middle school, got it from my school's library. Next thing I knew my mom had read it and was forcing it onto anyone who would listen! Those who read it invariably loved it. It's quite dark in a way as the main characters are a very rough around the edges, isolated old man who takes in a young boy who was horribly abused, but they change each other's lives for the better. An easy and very satisfying read, and one of those books I'd recommend to absolutely everyone, regardless of the sort of books they normally go for.

Robert Jay Lifton is another favorite author, though a non-fiction one. His books are a balance of interesting facts, sociology and psychology. The Nazi Doctors is amazing. I eat up anything having to do with the Holocaust and this was a really amazing study of the role doctors played during that time period. It changed the whole way I thought of it, really. Shorter books of his: Destroying the World to Save It, a study of Aum Shinrikyo, the cult behind the Tokyo subway sarin gas attack, and Hiroshima in America, which anyone who is even marginally interested in the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki should read.

Battle Royale by Koushun Takami. I read this in one day, it was that hard to pull myself away from it.

Um..what else.

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. Ethan Fromme is also spectacularly depressing.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, of course.

HENRY MILLER. Another timeless classic here. I loved Tropic of Cancer and The Colossus of Maroussi is my favorite book of his.

I especially liked Tropic of Cancer as it describes events during the time period when he first met and become close to Anais Nin, another favorite author/diarist of mine. Henry and June is wonderful.

The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The only book by him worth reading, in my opinion.

Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse. Amazing but so bizarre that I won't even attempt to describe it. Definitely my favorite book of his.

Neil Gaiman, ohh Neil Gaiman. American Gods is amazing beyond words.

The Mennyms series by Sylvia Waugh. These are children's books but I didn't discover them until I was 18 and have read the series multiple times since then. It's about a family of living rag dolls and is by turns creepy and very endearing. Wonderful characters.

Not necessarily favorites but highly recommended:

Dave Pelzer's books (A Child Called It, The Lost Boy, A Man Named Dave). Written by a survivor of child abuse, horrific but overall quite inspirational.

William Gibson's Sprawl Trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive) for anyone who likes science fiction.

Paulo Coelho..don't much care for his newer books but Veronika Decides to Die and The Zahir are good reads.

Mark Dunn's books make for good summer reads, cheerfully eccentric books like Ella Minnow Pea and Welcome to Higby.

And of course Tennessee Williams' plays. And David Sedaris. His books are hilarious.

And Malcolm Gladwell's books, like Blink and The Tipping Point. Pop sociology, very interesting and easy to get through.

The Beauty Myth is a worthwhile read for anyone with feminist leanings. I didn't agree with all the points she made but overall pretty eye-opening. Whipping Boy by Julia Serano is also pretty interesting, linking transphobia with homophobia and misogyny.

..and there are probably more but that's about enough rambling about books.

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Lookonthesunnyside
And has anyone read The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, and how'd you like it?

I've read it! I read it in high school and it was honestly what got me into reading. If you read it you will most likely fly through it. It is upsetting though and really got to me. I'm also a sensitive person though.

If you do read it lemme know what you think!

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Butterfly of the Moment

The Perks of Being A Wallflower is a good book.....the main character has this beautiful innocence about him. Courtesan by Diane Haeger is a historical fiction about Diane de Poitiers and the King of France...it's romantic and enthralling...the lead lady in the book is a cougar haha but it works.

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chattykathy

I have been on this classical kick. Lately I have read Jane Eyre, Oliver Twist, Tom Saywer, Dante's Inferno and Fahrenheit 451. My Mom sent my The Shack, I am not sure if I'll get into it or not. I have heard mixed reviews.

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