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mellow

How easy is it to get HSV ?

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mellow

This is probably a silly question on this forum, but I am wondering how easy it is to get HSV from someone who is not having an outbreak and has a mild case of HSV. I have read somewhere on this forum it is difficult to get if the person is not having an outbreak or shortly thereafter, but then I read so many cases where some people have gotton it during a one night stand... so what is correct.

Some of the articles make it sound like the probablity of contracting HSV is slim and then so many get it quickly. Can you give me some real world answers. I hope this is not to foolish or basic of a question but I really don't understand.

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lizabeth

it's a skin to skin transmission.. it's possible to get H from a one night stand yes..

Many don't know they are infected b/c it's not in standard STD testing..

If the infected partner is taking precautions like maybe the medication or even an over the counter (lysine) if their outbreaks are mild like you say

it'll lower the chance of you getting the virus..

If you use a condom it lowers the chance..

Knowledge will help ... if they know their triggers' (some people it's stress.. mine is rough sex).. knowing that and being pro-active is helpful..

the virus can't live long without a body.. so you're not likely to get it thru the toilet seat or sheets...

What type does your partner have?? That probably should have been my first question.. I have genital and that's the aspect I'm replying to you..

I don't have Oral and I'm less familiar..

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JBnATL

Liz is right, as always

There are articles on this site that talk about the percentages of the likelihood of transmission. If you use condoms and take suppressive meds the chance of transmission is only 1%.

It is also more difficult for a guy to get it from a girl than the other way around.

I have had this 'gift' many years and have dated many women without passing it along.

Good luck!

JB

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mellow

thanks for comments. The person has genital herpes and has said she has one mild outbreak a year. She has lived with this for over 10 years, but I am so new to this and never had any thing like this so I am a bit nervous about it. I was tested and my tests were OK.

It sounds like you are saying of condoms are used and care is taken duirng or around the time of her OB, then the percentage is pretty low for me to get this. I feel pretty ill informed and certainly concerned about gettng it and then adjusting to life with it. She is the only person I know who has herpes so I joined the site to try and find out what might be ahead for me and how easy ti could be for me to get it.

Thanks for your opennes and feel free to add anymore advise or info.. I can use it :-)

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talesofagirl

1) Find out what kind she has. GHSV-1 sheds 3-5% of the time w/out an outbreak, GHSV-2 sheds about 18-20%.

2) Is she on Valtrex? Valtrex supposedly reduces shedding by 50%.

3) Condoms used EVERY TIME supposedly reduce your risk by 30%.

So, if it's type 1, the risk would be (statistically speaking) as much as 1.75%,

type 2 would be as much as 7%, if using valtrex and condoms every time.

But it's not really a numbers game. Because none of those numbers matter if you catch it. So just take your time, and be comfortable with whatever it is you do.

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foxyloxy25

I agree with Talesofagirl on the figures.

However, the figures are not really that relevant. It took me seven years with my infected partner to catch it, my sister caught herpes four months into her relationship with her husband, and one friend got herpes from a one night stand who had no symptoms.

Catching herpes is like throwing dice and trying (not) to get three sixes.

Yes, statistically the odds of getting those three sixes to turn up together are slim, but the odds are the same every time you throw - meaning that you are just as likely to throw them on you first roll as on your 300th.

So with herpes, the chance per year of getting herpes may be low, but you are just as likely to get it on your first sexual encounter as on your 100th or 1000th. Some people will catch it the first time like my friend, others will not get it in a decade.

The majority of people who get herpes get it from a partner who does not currently have symptoms. It may be that some of these have symptoms but do not recognise them.

One study quoted 70% of people with herpes as having caught it from a currently symptomless partner. I don't know what the other 30% were thinking...

There is an average figure for so called 'viral shedding' in between outbreaks, but the reality is that it varies hugely from individual to individual.

One study detected virus present on swabs on anything from 1-75% of days when symptoms were not present, depending on the person. Another found that 75% of people with genital hsv-1 do not shed the virus at all when symptoms are not present. There is probably a big difference in likelihood of passing the virus on between the person who sheds the virus on 1% of days and the person who sheds it on 75% of days, and yet they both have the same infection.

In this study, there was some indication that people who have fewer outbreaks shed less. If your girl has only one recurrence per year, it is likely her chance of passing it on is lower than someone with more frequent outbreaks.

It was also noted that tests for the virus are so sensitive now, they have no real idea of whether there is any correlation between the presence of tiny amounts of virus on some days and the actual ability to infect a partner.

Another interesting thing was that infectious days often appeared in 'clusters' almost like an outbreak with no visual symptoms.

So, there are no absolutes.She may be one of the people who sheds less between outbreaks, if at all, she might be experiencing viral shedding a lot. On average, the risk is low, especially given her number of outbreaks.

I do think that people who are aware of their infection and their bodies are less likely to put their partners at risk. So I think you are less likely to catch it from a girl who is aware and informs you than from one who is not. I am convinced that the reason it took me 7 years to catch my boyfriend's herpes was because he was so careful about watching his symptoms and avoiding contact during them.

It is definitely harder for a girl to give herpes to a guy than a guy to give it to a girl. If we are going by average chances, the risk (practicing unprotected sex) of a man transmitting hsv-2 to an uninfected woman, per year, is 10%, while the risk of a woman infecting a man is 6% - just over half the risk. You can reduce that to a 3% risk if she takes valtrex or acyclovir. If you then use condoms as well, the risk of transmission is 2% per year. If it is genital hsv-1 she has and not hsv-2, the risk is lower.

Just be aware statistics mean little :-)

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solvingtheproblem

Hi Talesofagirl -- would you mind sharing the sources of your data? I have different transmission rates info. Terri Warren, the HSV expert for Web MD and the person responsible for the Westover Clinic Herpes Handbook, says for female --> male HSV2 transmission rates are:

4% = avoiding sex between OBs

2% = avoiding sex between OBs + condom use OR supressive therapy

1% = avoiding sex between OBs + condom use AND supressive therapy

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ntdc

So with herpes, the chance per year of getting herpes may be low, but you are just as likely to get it on your first sexual encounter as on your 100th or 1000th. Some people will catch it the first time like my friend, others will not get it in a decade.

Just a clarification to this. Your risk-per-contact stays the same but your overall risk increases every time you have sex. So generally

no you are not as likely to catch on your first sexual encounter than

your 1,000th , though it does happen.

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foxyloxy25
Your risk-per-contact stays the same but your overall risk increases every time you have sex. So generally

no you are not as likely to catch on your first sexual encounter than

your 1,000th , though it does happen.

I didn't realise it wasn't clear.

Since you are taking a risk with each contact, your overall risk WILL increase each time you have sex - but that does not make the chance of catching herpes on the 1st encounter any higher than catching it on the 21st or vice versa.

Each encounter has the exact same risk of giving you herpes - obviously if you are racking up lots of encounters the cumulative risk of all the encounters you have had is greater but the individual risk per encounter is the same for each and every encounter, whether it be the first or the 100th.

So it is incorrect that you are not as likely to catch it on your first encounter. Each encounter carries the same risk - the 'risk per encounter is the same' or the 'chance' each time is the same. Cumulative risk is merely an expression of how likely it is that something will have happened by that time, and is an artificial statistical construct. It is in fact just as likely to catch herpes from an encounter at the start of the relationship as 7 years into it as I did.

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ntdc

In a way we are both right, the funny thing is the per contact risk can be interpreted as variable depending on how you slice and dice the numbers.

For example if you are sleeping with an african-american your per-contact risk would be considerably higher as a larger percentage are infected than hispanics or caucasians (in the US). Just like with HIV, there is an overall per-contact risk but you wouldn't say a heterosexual male's per-contact risk is the same as a homosexual male.

Though on the whole i agree with you, abstinence is the only way to actually ensure you are never infected.

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mellow

Thank you all for your great info...sharing all that certainly was helpful... so much unknown and hearing for quality folks like you is a help. Thank you.

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Kikitos
1) Find out what kind she has. GHSV-1 sheds 3-5% of the time w/out an outbreak, GHSV-2 sheds about 18-20%.

2) Is she on Valtrex? Valtrex supposedly reduces shedding by 50%.

3) Condoms used EVERY TIME supposedly reduce your risk by 30%.

So, if it's type 1, the risk would be (statistically speaking) as much as 1.75%,

type 2 would be as much as 7%, if using valtrex and condoms every time.

But it's not really a numbers game. Because none of those numbers matter if you catch it. So just take your time, and be comfortable with whatever it is you do.

There is a wat to be sure to not get it =

CONDOM

+ no skin to skin contact in the genital area = the guy keeps his pants or boxe so the penis and the zone around (balls, ass, tight....) is covered.

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Kikitos

In this study, there was some indication that people who have fewer outbreaks shed less. If your girl has only one recurrence per year, it is likely her chance of passing it on is lower than someone with more frequent outbreaks.

May be people who have no outbreaks have even more asymptotic sheding than people who have outbreaks.

They both shed the virus as often but some have no symptoms and other have.

In such a case, people who have outbreaks are less dangerous.

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Shayna
May be people who have no outbreaks have even more asymptotic sheding than people who have outbreaks.

They both shed the virus as often but some have no symptoms and other have.

In such a case, people who have outbreaks are less dangerous.

Okay, this makes no sense at all. sorry!

The virus is simply not as active in some people. If someone has no outbreaks they likely shed less because the virus is less active.

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Kikitos
Okay, this makes no sense at all. sorry!

The virus is simply not as active in some people. If someone has no outbreaks they likely shed less because the virus is less active.

The fact that you have or don't have outbreaks as no link with the fact that the virus is more or less active. The virus is always the same. How your body deal with it makes the difference. I thin that the body has no way to help the virus going from the nerve to the skin. But is can help it making sores.

If you have no sore, it just means that your antibodies work better.

But in both case, the sheding (virus going via nerves to the skin) has no reason to be different.

In first case, antibodies are efficient and you have no symptoms.

In the other case, antobodied are less efficient and you have symptoms (though less strong than when you had no antibody).

You an spread it in both situation. May be more during a cold sore that breaks. But in both cases, you spread it as often.

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mileshi78
I agree with Talesofagirl on the figures.

However, the figures are not really that relevant. It took me seven years with my infected partner to catch it, my sister caught herpes four months into her relationship with her husband, and one friend got herpes from a one night stand who had no symptoms.

Catching herpes is like throwing dice and trying (not) to get three sixes.

Yes, statistically the odds of getting those three sixes to turn up together are slim, but the odds are the same every time you throw - meaning that you are just as likely to throw them on you first roll as on your 300th.

So with herpes, the chance per year of getting herpes may be low, but you are just as likely to get it on your first sexual encounter as on your 100th or 1000th. Some people will catch it the first time like my friend, others will not get it in a decade.

The majority of people who get herpes get it from a partner who does not currently have symptoms. It may be that some of these have symptoms but do not recognise them.

One study quoted 70% of people with herpes as having caught it from a currently symptomless partner. I don't know what the other 30% were thinking...

There is an average figure for so called 'viral shedding' in between outbreaks, but the reality is that it varies hugely from individual to individual.

One study detected virus present on swabs on anything from 1-75% of days when symptoms were not present, depending on the person. Another found that 75% of people with genital hsv-1 do not shed the virus at all when symptoms are not present. There is probably a big difference in likelihood of passing the virus on between the person who sheds the virus on 1% of days and the person who sheds it on 75% of days, and yet they both have the same infection.

In this study, there was some indication that people who have fewer outbreaks shed less. If your girl has only one recurrence per year, it is likely her chance of passing it on is lower than someone with more frequent outbreaks.

It was also noted that tests for the virus are so sensitive now, they have no real idea of whether there is any correlation between the presence of tiny amounts of virus on some days and the actual ability to infect a partner.

Another interesting thing was that infectious days often appeared in 'clusters' almost like an outbreak with no visual symptoms.

So, there are no absolutes.She may be one of the people who sheds less between outbreaks, if at all, she might be experiencing viral shedding a lot. On average, the risk is low, especially given her number of outbreaks.

I do think that people who are aware of their infection and their bodies are less likely to put their partners at risk. So I think you are less likely to catch it from a girl who is aware and informs you than from one who is not. I am convinced that the reason it took me 7 years to catch my boyfriend's herpes was because he was so careful about watching his symptoms and avoiding contact during them.

It is definitely harder for a girl to give herpes to a guy than a guy to give it to a girl. If we are going by average chances, the risk (practicing unprotected sex) of a man transmitting hsv-2 to an uninfected woman, per year, is 10%, while the risk of a woman infecting a man is 6% - just over half the risk. You can reduce that to a 3% risk if she takes valtrex or acyclovir. If you then use condoms as well, the risk of transmission is 2% per year. If it is genital hsv-1 she has and not hsv-2, the risk is lower.

Just be aware statistics mean little :-)

this description is all over the map.

But likely true...

the only way to not contract type II from an infected partner is to never be undressed with them. ha, wear a large bathing suit.

Not worth it.

Find a different partner not challenged.

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