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NoobNoob

Is HSV-1 considered STD ?

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Hi

Is HSV-1 (cold sore on the face) considered a STD ?

Not scientificaly speaking.

But generaly speaking, do people still perceive HSV-1 to be STD ?

How many people do you know that live with HSV-1 and mentally doing well ?

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I posted on another topic. I think because of my experiance which was sad that you had better consider this condition as sexually transmitted although it can vbe transmitted other ways. Times are changing and you had better bring the subject up.

I grew up thinking most people had them and you just shouldn't kiss someone when you had them and later not to have oral sex.

Herpes has now been linked to an increased supseptibily to other conditions.

I hope this will cause more study and hopefully a cure.

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I wouldn't consider cold sores on the mouth a STD but you have to be VERY careful. People think that everyone has had a cold sore. Well I was 18 years old and NEVER had one and I had oral sex w/ someone that did and now I have type 1 HSV on my genitals. That was 8 years and I've only had 1 out break since the initial one but still I have it. If I would have had cold sores on the mouth then I would not have been infected w/ it on my genitals.

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Hi I'm not trying to make light of your situation but I'd rather have hsv1 than hsv2 anyday!!!!!!!

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Well did you know that HSV1 is considered an STD if received via ORAL SEX?

I have HSV2. And just to make you aware, Herpes is Herpes no matter how you look at it. I would rather have NONE. But unfortunately I wasn't given any choice.

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