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chasensnana

Born with it..

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chasensnana

My 6 month old grandson was diagnosed at 11 days old.My daughter did'nt even know she had it....He is taking meds...until age 2....He has HSV CNS...Its in his brain fluid and spinal fluid....So anyone know about this please let me know...

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WarriorKing

I don't have any clinical information here for you. Someone else may contribute here. But yes, most of the population carries herpes, it has been with us for over 4500 years, and most do not know that they carry it.

I personally believe that while children are susceptible to and have to create resistance to all manner of "bugs" in this world, they are also more powerful and resilient than adults. I wish the best for your grandson.

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chasensnana

thank you so much just want to know he carries this in his brain and spinal fluids...thank you for being kind to me.....

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babygabriel

My sweet little grandson was born Dec 29th with HSV CNS. He is having such a hard time with it - the first time that he got to come home after birth he was home for 3 days and the blisters came back. He was in the hospital again for 14 days - IV treatment and then got to come home. He was home that time for 4 days and again the blisters came back - he was in the hospital again for 14 days IV treatment and then sent home and prescribed the oral medication 3 times a day. That stay at home lasted 9 days and now he has been back in the hospital since last Thursday - they have increased his dosage amount and still every morning he wakes up with new blisters. This morning the "team" of doctors met and came into the room to say that they don't know what else to do, that they may just release him and increase his dosage even more and have my daughter monitor him!! I can't believe this!! We are so worried about him and haven't been able to find a physician in our state with this speciallty. He is currently in the Children's hospital that is ranked #1 in our state??? He has blood in his stools and they tell us that it is because the medicine is so hard on his insides. He cries out in pain occasionally and is spitting up a lot now, something that he has never done before. Please, we have tried to find someone to talk to in our area - we can't even get the doctors to give us straight answers.

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inquiring1

Immunological Specialist?

babygabriel,

Is there a physician specializing in immunology in your area? That is who I would look for in this situation; even if, they are not pediatricians maybe they would be able to give you a referal. I would try researching on-line for this type of doctor, and hope to find one within travel distance.

As a health care professional I see conditions that manifest systemically. I certainly do not mean to offend, but where do your grandsons ob's occur with the CNS HSV+? Also, one of the HSV symptoms can be anorexia which, I would think could be devastating in itself to a newborn.

Please keep us informed, and I will ask around to see if any of my co-workers have better suggestions. Wishing Gabriel all the best.

Sincerely,

Inquiring1 ;)

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Canadian Daisy

Don't have any advice but saying a prayer that your grandson is doing better!

That's really nice of you inq to ask others for their suggestions! You rock!!!

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babygabriel

I have been researching frantically to try and get him some help and find a support group so that we can talk with other parents that are currently going through this also, or that have been through this. We are constantly asking the nurses questions, and they give basic answers or say that they will have someone come and talk to us. There aren't any support groups in our area that I have been able to find, and when we do a search for a physician that specializes in this area 2 names come up and they are in the same practice as the one that is currently handling his case. I will do a search for "immunology" and hopefully find something.

His outbreaks originally came back in the same spots each time - the ball of his thumb on his hand, on the tip of his pointer finger, in between his pinky and ring finger, a spot on his belly and a spot on his back. This time has been much worse - it is not only in the original spots, but now also on his penis, his chin, his ear lobe and my daughter called last night to say that his belly and back have broken out almost looking like a rash. I don't think that he has anorexia, he loves to eat and although he does now spit up some - it's not enough that I would think that he's not eating enough.

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond - it means the world to me. I want to ask one more question if you don't mind. Are you a specialist in this field? I only ask because I have some questions that I would like to ask if you are.

Looking forward to hearing back from you. Please keep sweet little Gabriel in your prayers.

Sincerely

Gabriel's Nana

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regret
http://www.westoverheights.com/genital_herpes/handbook.html go to this sight and see if you can talk to the nurse terry, who specializes in herpes.. if she cant help you she may know a dr. who specializes with herpes in children.. its worth checking into. unfortunatley not many people know what to do with herpes in the medical field,what they know about herpes is old information , they dont have much training in this area. thats why we have this websight we learn from each others experiences because we get wrong info from the dr.s...the medical field doesnt take herpes seriously so they are misinformed and uneducated on the topic, you have to become educated about it yourself and be an advocate for the child, good luck

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chasensnana

my grandson has never had an outbreak....thank god....I am sorry for you and your family...Are you seeing an infectious disease dr. thats who we see.Blood in the stool they told us it was protein senstivity.....He did spit up alot and they changed his formula to Alimentum....Any help I can be please let me know...We go to Childrens Hospital in Norfolk Va.My grandbaby is 7 months old today...He does take acylovir 2x a day...

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chasensnana

if there is anything I as Nana can do for you I will try...I am frantically searching for answers for my grandson....Why? How? the dr.here says my grandson is a miracle.....Because he's never had an outbreak...He goes to his dr.(infectious disease) once a month his med.levels have been low several times...They say he can have an outbreak...anytime but he has not....I am in the process of doing alot of research and contacting different children's hospitals all over the country because we want answers....Also he has suffered hearing loss and not sure how much yet we will know on friday...he has stomach problems...currently takes meds for that I would like to talk to u more maybe we can help each other.....send me a message....Tajke care and I hold you in my prayers....Chasensnana

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package deal

I will cewrtainly pray for your grandson and his parents and you. What i was able to research for you is not very good and i debated even posting it here. but decided to .

medlineplus_print_us.png

Birth-acquired herpes

URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001368.htm

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Birth-acquired herpes is a herpes virus infection that an infant gets (acquires) at the time of birth.

Causes

Newborn infants can become infected with herpes virus:

  • In the uterus (intrauterine herpes -- this is very rare)
  • Passing through the birth canal (birth-acquired herpes, the most common method of infection)
  • Right after birth (postpartum) from kissing or having other contact with someone who has herpes mouth sores

If the mother has an active genital herpes infection at the time of delivery, the baby is more likely to become infected during birth. Some mothers may not be aware they have internal (inside the vagina) herpes sores.

Some people have had herpes infections in the past, but were not aware of it. These people, not knowing that they have herpes, may pass it to their baby.

Herpes type 2 (genital herpes) is the most common cause of herpes infection in newborn babies, but herpes type 1 (oral herpes) can also occur.

Symptoms

Herpes may only appear as a skin infection. Small, fluid-filled blisters (vesicles) may appear. These blisters rupture, crust over, and finally heal, often leaving a mild scar.

Herpes infection may also spread throughout the body (called disseminated herpes). In this type, the herpes virus can affect many different parts of the body.

  • Herpes infection in the brain is called herpes encephalitis
  • The liver, lungs, and kidneys may also be involved
  • There may or may not be blisters on the skin

Newborn infants with herpes that has spread to the brain or other parts of the body are often very sick. Symptoms include:

  • Bleeding easily
  • Breathing difficulties
    • Blue appearance (cyanosis)
    • Flaring of the nostrils
    • Grunting
    • Rapid breathing (tachypnea)
    • Short periods without breathing (apneic episodes)

    [*]Coma

    [*]Jaundice

    [*]Lethargy

    [*]Low body temperature (hypothermia)

    [*]Poor feeding

    [*]Seizures

    [*]Shock

    [*]Skin lesions, fluid-filled blisters

Herpes that is caught in the period shortly after birth has symptoms similar to those of birth-acquired herpes.

Intrauterine herpes can cause:

  • Eye disease, such as inflammation of the retina (chorioretinitis)
  • Severe brain damage
  • Skin sores (lesions)

Exams and Tests

Tests for birth-acquired herpes include:

Additional tests that may be done if the baby is very sick include:

Treatment

Herpes virus infections in infants are generally treated with medicine given through a vein (intravenous). Acyclovir is the most common antiviral medicine used for this purpose. The baby may need to take the medicine for several weeks.

Other therapy is often needed to treat the effects of herpes infection, such as shock or seizures. Often, because these babies are very ill, treatment is done in an intensive care unit.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Infants with systemic herpes or encephalitis often do poorly, despite antiviral medications and early treatment.

In infants with skin disease, the vesicles may come back repeatedly even after treatment is finished. These recurrences put them at risk for learning disabilities, and may need to be treated.

Possible Complications

  • Bacterial or fungal infection of skin lesions
  • Coma
  • Death
  • Developmental delay
  • Excessive bleeding, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)
  • Eye problems (chorioretinitis, keratitis)
  • Gastrointestinal problems, including diarrhea
  • Hepatitis
  • Jaundice
  • Liver failure
  • Lung problems including pneumonia or pneumonitis
  • Brain and nervous system (neurological) problems
  • Respiratory distress
  • Seizure
  • Shock
  • Skin lesions

When to Contact a Medical Professional

If your baby has any symptoms of birth-acquired herpes, including skin lesions alone, have the baby seen by your health care provider promptly.

Prevention

It is important for women to tell their doctor if they have a history of genital herpes.

Safer sexual practices can help prevent the mother from getting genital herpes. Mothers who are not infected with herpes cannot pass the herpes virus to the baby during delivery.

People with "cold sores" (herpes labialis) should avoid contact with newborn infants. Caregivers who have a cold sore should wear a surgical mask and wash their hands carefully before coming into contact with the infant to prevent transmitting the virus.

Mothers should speak to their health care providers about the best way to minimize the risk of transmitting herpes to their infant.

Alternative Names

HSV; Congenital herpes; Herpes - congenital

References

Red Book: 2009 Report on The Committee on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Cernik C, Gallina K, Brodell RT. The treatment of herpes simplex infections: An evidence-based review. Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(11):1137-1144.

Hollier LM, Wendel GD. Third trimester antiviral prophylaxis for preventing maternal genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) recurrences and neonatal infection. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;23(1):CD004946.

Update Date: 9/16/2010

Updated by: Sameer Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

Browse the Encyclopedia

MedlinePlus Topics

Images

17145t.jpgCongenital herpes

Read More

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A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2011, A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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chasensnana

Thank you so much for posting this....I appreciate it we are takeing it day by day learning more....My grandbaby is 7 months as of yesterday...No outbreaks so far...but has had some problems...He has suffered some damage to his hearing which we will find out more tomorrow he has another test...I pray everyday my daughter is just 19 and a single mother....The babies dad is not involved,So the support is her family....Thanks so much....God Bless....Chasensnana

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      I’m more than sure you got it from your current boyfriend. 5 days later and you have an outbreak in the anal where you did it for the first time. I had a vaginal outbreak 5 days after unprotected sex with my ex. I knew I was from him because of the negative tests I had during my outbreak. Unfortunately he was i denial about the situation and didn’t support me at all. Your boyfriend may not have been aware that he had it. And he may also lie about it if he finds out he actually does carry the virus. Hopefully he gets tested and things get sorted out for the both of you. 
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      If you are having genital symptoms. . and test positive for hsv1 its very relevant. Op may indeed have ghsv1
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