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First its Positive for HSV2 IGG than its Negaitve for HSV2 IGG, what to think


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free2choose101

So my wife and i both had many risky sexual encounters before we married. We both were tested in 2009 and the results came back negative. In 2012 i started getting sores on my genitals and freaked out. I was tested with the HSV 2 IGG, Type Spec blood test In Sept of 2012 and it came back negative. But in June of 2013 i came in for a follow up and the HSV2 IGG Type Spec test came back positive with a 1.22 score. I couldnt belive it after all this time to get a ding on the +. So i waited for the next sore and near the end of July 2013 i had a swab done, a HSV 1 IGG Type Spec blood test and a HSV 2 IGG Type Spec blood test done. All 3 tests came back negative <.91. What am i to think, Should i get the Western Blot test or retest in a few months the IGG blood test?

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Were these tests from the same kit, say Herpeselect? Different kits may have slight variants in outcomes.

The positive result, particularly from a Herpeselect kit, is a low positive and people in that range especially with no other symptoms (although I note you do) have well over a 50% chance of being negative for HSV-2.

The later test seems to give more weight to the notion you are negative for HSV-2. I feel you can put the issue to rest of this being HSV-2... But not HSV-1.

Clearly sores are an issue, if not for herpes maybe something else. I really feel the best you can do is no more blood tests but to have a swab of any future sores if you are concerned. It's the best way of identifying the type and location of HSV.

There is a chance the sores are the result of HSV-1. For about 1 in 10 people this does not show up in blood testing. Is your wife also free of HSV-1?

In the circumstances of a committed relationship is this really an issue for the two of you? If you've eliminated the real nasties is there a need in both of you to spend effort tracking down whether one or both of you has some less than common issues with HSV-1 (or maybe HSV-2)? Think about it, as it may take quite some time, cost and emotion to identify HSV and then do precisely what with the outcome??

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free2choose101

My wife did test postive for HPVN but its not warts i get, but ulcer looking spots. At this point i just want to find out if i have HSV 2 so i can accept it and do my best to not spread a std to my kid with careless hygiene. I've read of the virus transmitting all sorts of different ways. I feel like im living out the movie Contagion with Matt Damon. My wife was tested 3 days ago but the test have not returned. PS. The Nurse said that once a test comes up positive they always consider you a potential carrier, does that mean im reported to the CDC?

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Did the 2009 tests for you and your wife also explicitly include IgG antibody type specific for HSV-1 and HSV-2? Were you tested at least 12 weeks post sexual contact with any other partner? If the answer to either of these questions is no, then it is possible that HSV is present in either or both of you. Let's assume for the moment that the answers are yes.

It is possible that your first negative HSV-2 test was done too soon after symptoms appeared to identify positive for antibodies, however this seems irrelevant now as you have had two subsequent tests that are in no way a firm positive for HSV-2. Tests are biassed toward producing false positives with other proteins in your blood reacting with the testing plate. A herpeselect score of 1.22 is very low (if that was the kit) and whilst a good indicator to test again, the subsequent negative is more likely to confirm that you do not have HSV-2.

Sexual contact is the key mechanism for transferring genital herpes. Towels, accidental brushing or touching (for a quick scratch of your genitals) then touching someone all carry no appreciable or detectable levels of risk. Standard and sensible hygiene measures will ensure your child does not become infected due to genital herpes.

I suggest that if your wife comes back again negative for all forms of HSV that it may be time to consider a Westernblot, which, as mentioned previously, is far more likely to identify a HSV-1 infection compared to commercially available blood tests.

I can see how the presence of sores is the concern that makes it hard to drop the whole issue even when tests are negative. Do the doctors think there is a chance that they do look like herpetic lesions? Where are they occurring, how long do they last and what is the frequency of recurrence?

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There are reports of people who test positive by IGG and then test again after and got a negative result. In the sample I read about, these people were then tested by western blot which was a clear positive , but the herpesselect stayed negative.

All very confusing. However, your positive was a low positive. Anything over 3.5 is considered a true positive. But, from what I've been learning, there is no test that will say 100% no you don't have it......

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