Jump to content

Hsv1 compared to hsv2


Recommended Posts

Why is it that cold sores is a normal acceptance, there are adds on the tv providing information about what cream to use to get rid of it etc.... But not hsv2.   It's the same virus but just in a different place. 

How can you tell someone that you have it and is it easy?  I am going on a date with a guy this week, and all I can think about is what I have.  I feel like I'm wasting his time, and there's no point in trying.  It's so different now. I feel like how can anybody want to be with me if they don't have it?  

Someone told me they had it before I got it and I ran away. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck on your date.  Don't ever feel that you are a lesser person because you have this virus.  90% of all adults have it in one form or another.  What you have is a very common, mostly harmless virus, nothing more.

There is a great section of this website "The Secret to our Success" it has hundreds of posts from people who thought like you do, that no one would ever want them, and they ended up finding someone who did not care.  Personally I have disclosed a dozen times and have NEVER been rejected.  Here is a link to a post I made about how I give the 'talk'.

 

Good luck!

JB

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I just know my reaction as Iv only been told once and then broke it off with him.....

where do I see this the secret of success? 

None of the info web pages work.... 

Edited by Flowers123
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, one more question..... There is hsv1 cold sores and genital herpes and hsv2 genital herpes right? So getting genital herpes from a cold sore is hsv1 genital?  I'm so confused about this all....

if that's correct, is there a difference in hsv1. &2 genital? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there;

hsv1 and hsv2 are almost identical.  The only real difference is their site of preference.  Hsv1 prefers to be oral and hsv2 prefers to be genital.  You can get hsv2 oral but that is very rare.  You can also get hsv1 genital and that is actually how most people now get genital herpes.  The good news is if you get them in the site that they DON'T prefer you will rarely suffer from outbreaks and spreading them from that location is almost impossible.  In fact, some doctors tell their patients who have ghsv1 that they don't have to disclose because it is so rare to spread from that location.

I hope this helps!

JB

Link to post
Share on other sites

Flowers iwas jus dignised with h 2. Met a guy we've been dating about 1 month haven't been intimite yet so I have not told him yet. Not that im waiting for that but he seems to want to take it slow. So im enjoying him and taking it one day at a time. I will tell him soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So what your saying is that hsv1 genitals ( I got it from a guy with a cold sore during oral) that it's not as contagious as if I had gotten it from his penis? 

So it's harder to spread it from my body to someone else's body?

i haven't had anyone to ask at all so thanks very much......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lillian, 

maybe he wants to take it slow for the same reason as you? 

I wish you all the best in mentioning it ......  Plz let me know how it goes.... Iv never told anyone 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...
On 4/25/2016 at 7:58 AM, JBnATL said:

Hi there;

hsv1 and hsv2 are almost identical.  The only real difference is their site of preference.  Hsv1 prefers to be oral and hsv2 prefers to be genital.  You can get hsv2 oral but that is very rare.  You can also get hsv1 genital and that is actually how most people now get genital herpes.  The good news is if you get them in the site that they DON'T prefer you will rarely suffer from outbreaks and spreading them from that location is almost impossible.  In fact, some doctors tell their patients who have ghsv1 that they don't have to disclose because it is so rare to spread from that location.

I hope this helps!

JB

can someone confirm this, i received hsv1 genitally from oral, but if someone goes down on me they are highly unlikely to get it? what is the likelihood %?

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, meg988 said:

can someone confirm this, i received hsv1 genitally from oral, but if someone goes down on me they are highly unlikely to get it? what is the likelihood %?

Yes it is correct becaus the HSV-1 virus rarely sheds in sufficient quantities to infect mouth or genitalia. 

The chances of transmission are about 1% chance in a year of oral sex!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Donate

    If Honeycomb has helped you, please help us by making a donation so we can provide you with even better features and services.

  • The Hive is Thriving!

    • Total Topics
      71,956
    • Total Posts
      486,518
  • 0_unsure-if-it-is-herpes.png

    Nervous about dating with herpes? Skip "the talk" and browse profiles here.

  • Posts

    • BabyGirl
      I just stared dating someone who does not have HSV.How long after the sore is healed should I wait before having sex?  I’ve had HSV2 for over 10 years. I rarely have outbreaks going months even years until recently. When I do I get some tingles and one sore in the same spot. But recently, In the last 3 months it’s happened twice. 🤦🏼‍♀️
    • JDMT_176
      If you want to know whats going on when applying it, this was the only study I found describing it. Hard to read through as very technical, but am copy paste parts I found of use. Tables also useful to show which genes are expressed more.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416766/   "A petrolatum donut was applied with a cotton swab to form about a 1 cm diameter donut on skin on the inner aspect of the upper arm. Then a separate cotton swab was dipped in a 2% SADBE solution (w/v) in DMSO, and the swab was then used to apply about 10–20 mg of solution over about a 1 cm diameter circle within the petrolatum donut. Immediately after application, the application site was covered with TEGADERM. Subjects were advised to remove the TEGADERM and rinse and wipe the spot 3 h later.   "Thus in essentially every case, the SADBE treatment changed the group A subjects by day 57 to make them much more like the group B and C subjects who have better immune control of their HSV‐1 infection than the group A subjects were on day 1.   "Others have previously shown that CD8+ T cells are important in controlling herpes labialis outbreaks.23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 Our data are consistent with this. The helper/cytotoxic cell ratio (CD4+/CD8+ ratio) was 5.25 in group A versus 3.07 and 3.15, respectively in groups B and C (Table (Table3).3). The P‐value is less than 0.20 for comparisons of group A to both groups B and C, and if groups B and C are pooled and compared to group A the P‐value is 0.065, almost significant. This is consistent with prior evidence discussed below that CD8+ T cells are important and effective in controlling HSV recurrences.   "Consistent with our finding lower anti‐HSV‐1 IgG levels correlate with better control of HSV‐1 outbreaks, Spruance et al. also found lower serum anti‐HSV‐1 antibodies in HSV seropositive patients with a history of frequent herpes labialis than in seropositive persons with no history of herpes labialis.33   "Several prior reports also found IFN‐gamma to be important in controlling HSV infection and reducing HSV outbreaks. Dobbs et al28 showed that CD8+ T cells were able to clear an HSV‐2 infection in transgenic mice, but that efficacy was blocked in vivo by anti‐IFNG IgG. Liu et al31 showed that CD8+ T‐cells could prevent HSV‐1 reactivation from latency in excised trigeminal ganglia (TG), and that IFN‐gamma protein was produced by the CD8+ T cells, and that neutralization of IFN‐γ significantly enhanced the rate of HSV‐1 reactivation from latency in TG cultures. Spruance et al33 found that IFN‐gamma protein levels in PBMC supernatants stimulated with HSV‐1‐infected cell extracts were lower in frequent herpes labialis sufferers than HSV‐1 seropositive controls, consistent with the present result for IFNG gene expression in PBMC stimulated with heat‐killed HSV‐1. McKenna et al7 assayed IFN‐gamma in medium of PBMCs cultured in vitro and stimulated with inactivated HSV‐1 and found IFN‐gamma was at higher concentrations in medium of PBMCs from infrequent herpes labialis sufferers than frequent sufferers, also consistent with our findings. Cunningham et al34 showed higher interferon levels (including alpha, gamma, and lambda) in supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with heat‐killed HSV‐1 virus correlated with longer time to next herpes labialis recurrence. Carr et al35 showed that transgenic expression of IFNG could prevent HSV‐1 reactivation in a mouse model.
    • JDMT_176
      Hi Kurdt- I was thinking back in 2018-2019 there was several threads from viral frog that he was applying a 2% solution very frequently. Like several times a week. From what I gather- it didnt work for him at the time. I think too much applied caused immune chaos or something.  The most recent Square X trial was terminated but this was the dosing frequency that was used in the trial below: I was planning on using Group C protocol. Group A is most frequent. Something to think about.  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT03521479?term=squarex&draw=1&rank=4   Protocol:  Arm/Group Title Group A Group B Group C Group D  Arm/Group Description Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and with 2% SADBE on the visits at week 3, week 6, week 9, and month 8. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and with 0.5% SADBE on the visits at week 3, week 6, week 9, and month 8. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0, month 3, and month 6. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and month 6. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months).   Adverse Reaction Table: Arm/Group Title Group A Group B Group C Group D  Arm/Group Description: Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and with 2% SADBE on the visits at week 3, week 6, week 9, and month 8. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and with 0.5% SADBE on the visits at week 3, week 6, week 9, and month 8. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0, month 3, and month 6. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Treated with 2% Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester (SADBE) on day 0 and month 6. Squaric Acid Dibutyl Ester: Repeat topical application of 2% and 0.5% squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) in subjects with frequent herpes labialis (4 or more episodes in the previous 12 months). Overall Number of Participants Analyzed 10 10 10 10 Measure Type: Number Unit of Measure: events         Localized reaction (rash, erythema, itching/pruritus, warmth/burning) at application site 24 14 17 6 Generalized adverse events (related, possible or greater) 2 3 1 0 Generalized adverse event (unrelated) 4 7 6 4  
    • Cas9
      No, it doesn't look like herpes at all. Why haven't you simply seen a dermatologist?
    • Neveragain99
      I've been having bumps appear on my face around my mouth for a couple years now. They usually take several weeks to disappear but these current lesions have been here for months now and don't seem to be healing at all. I've been applying salicylic acid and oil of oregano twice a week but am having no luck and it appears to be getting worst. This has completely destroyed my self esteem and I've given up on trying to date...  I've attached an image if anyone could help me out with a diagnosis or some type of regiment to help make them go away i'd be forever indebted!  Thanks 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.