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LillianPanos

Glutamine supplementation suppresses herpes simplex virus reactivation

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moialbalushi

Wow. This is really interesting !! Specially that bodybuilders soemtimes  use glutamine as a supplement. 

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realscience77

Wow. I work out 3 to 5 times a week in the gym. I am going to up the Glutamine intake and see if I notice a difference. I dont have typical outbreaks, only nerve issues so lets see if it helps!

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moialbalushi
1 hour ago, realscience77 said:

Wow. I work out 3 to 5 times a week in the gym. I am going to up the Glutamine intake and see if I notice a difference. I dont have typical outbreaks, only nerve issues so lets see if it helps!

Great man, keep us updated then plz ^^

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Hansje

I ordered it but won't be using it during the Viblok trial. I do not want to mess up the results. 

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LillianPanos

I thought so.thanks

30 minutes ago, Hansje said:

I ordered it but won't be using it during the Viblok trial. I do not want to mess up the results. 

 

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LillianPanos

I have never taken this. How much di recommend I take. I work out.vim 5'3" 125 ponds

6 hours ago, moialbalushi said:

Great man, keep us updated then plz ^^

 

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realscience77

Bodybuilders typically take 10 to 15 grams a day of Glutamine. That's how I plan to start. I plan on doing a serving in the morning and after workouts. 5 gram scoops.  I have also bought some pills as well so I might hit 20 grams a day.

I will be using powder and pill supplements. I will keep you guys and gals updated to see if notice anything different. 

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moialbalushi
16 hours ago, LillianPanos said:

I have never taken this. How much di recommend I take. I work out.vim 5'3" 125 ponds

 

Sorry I just noticed ur question. ^^

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byornk

I've been taking L-glutamine along with my whey protein powder and found (anecdotally) that my symptoms would tend to subside for the rest of the day. Well lo and behold, the effects of l-glutamine have been substantiated in mice:

https://www.jci.org/articles/view/88990

Glutamine supplementation suppresses herpes simplex virus reactivation
Kening Wang ... Philip R. Krause, Jeffrey I. Cohen
J Clin Invest. 2017. doi:10.1172/JCI88990


Selective quote from the abstract:

Quote

 

Here, we found that supplementation with oral glutamine reduced virus reactivation in latently HSV-1–infected mice and HSV-2–infected guinea pigs.

...

Mice treated with glutamine also had higher numbers of HSV-specific IFN-γ–producing CD8 T cells in latently infected ganglia. Thus, glutamine may enhance the IFN-γ–associated immune response and reduce the rate of reactivation of latent virus infection.

 

 

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byornk

FYI I have been taking the covalently-bonded variety of glutamine on the grounds of claims that it resides in the body for a longer period of time. The variety given to the mice may or may not have been different.

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wildman

Interesting. If the reported T cell effect is accurate and at all translatable to humans, one might think it should affect almost anything related to immunology, not just HSV. In any case, one question would be how effective oral glutamine supplementation would be at increasing plasma levels in humans, and for how long - it might not work the same way, or it might require taking some pretty substantial supplement amounts at very frequent intervals. The evidence for/against glutamine supplementation in humans for therapeutic purposes seems mixed historically (though it doesn't seem harmful).

There is some broader research:

"Dosing and Efficacy of Glutamine Supplementation in Human Exercise and Sport Training1,2"

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/10/2045S.full

"Glutamine metabolism and its effects on immune response: molecular mechanism and gene expression"

https://nutrirejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41110-016-0016-8

Edited by wildman

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LillianPanos

I was not able to find this in walmart or several Walgreen stores. I see its on Amazon will order it there. Anyone have any luck with it.

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cantdoit
50 minutes ago, LillianPanos said:

I was not able to find this in walmart or several Walgreen stores. I see its on Amazon will order it there. Anyone have any luck with it.

Just go to a health food store. They should have it. Whole Foods if you can. I take it for my thyroid as per my doctor. 

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IcantThinkofaName

From Dr Axe:

A medical study published in 2001 found that L-glutamine benefits the body by regulating IgA immune response. IgA is an antibody that attacks viruses and bad bacteria. (It’s also  associated with food sensitivities and allergies.)

Another study published in the journal of Clinical Immunology found that L-glutamine normalizes the effects of the TH2 immune response that stimulates inflammatory cytokines. (11)

The effects of L-glutamine in these studies prove that L-glutamine reduces intestinal inflammation and can help people recover from food sensitivities. (leaky gut)

https://draxe.com/l-glutamine-benefits-side-effects-dosage/

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