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justmyluck27

Help getting Valtrex

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justmyluck27

I have GHSV2, confirmed by IgG and Western Blot.  I live in a small town where I personally know people both at my doctor's office and the pharmacy in town.  I'm far too embarrassed to go to my doctor or pharmacy and ask for or pick up Valtrex.  Because of this, I have been living with herpes without prescription drug help for over a year.  I'm tired of this.  Has anyone had success ordering from online pharmacies?  Can anyone help me?

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GlitterDx

If you have health insurance you can use the mail order prescription service for your insurer. You can try getting a prescription from an online doctor. You can go to the next town over? 

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Atrapasueños

Usted tiene problemas para conseguir antivirales no imagino a las personas de escasos recursos que no pueden obtener antivirales por su situación económica o por el estigma

 

You have problems getting antivirals I can not imagine people with limited resources who can not get antivirals due to their economic situation or stigma

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