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Almostcertain

Help with Neuralgia and Valtrex

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Almostcertain

I think I was exposed 7 weeks ago to the virus, and even though I have not been diagnosed yet, I am sure I have one of the two types of Genital Herpes.

I My original post is this one:  (

 

I went on the 19th to read the second set of results. The sample was taken on the 12th (4 weeks after exposure). 

The test they performed was once again the IgM test, and came back negative.  But as many of you have read, that test is unreliable and an IgG test is the one that should be perfomed at 12-16 weeks after exposure.  So, I have to wait until that time to get that lab work done.

The female in question showed me her IgG Herpes select for HSV1/HSV2 and they came back negative, and states that she has not had any symptoms.  That left me a little perplexed with what exactly is going on. Did she contract it closely before my encounter with her,  passed it on to me, but has not developed antibodies for it yet?

 I have started to take daily suppressive therapy with Valtrex 1g, twice a day, because I don't want to have an actual OB, nor the incredible pain I endured during the first week after exposure.(I did react positively to Valtrex, symptms subsided considerably during the inital course treatment) 

My biggest concerns are that I live  every second of my days with what seems to be prodrome symptoms,  my genitals are constantly burning/ tingling.  My thighs sometimes burn as well.  I developed what I would call is nerve pain along my left leg (from upper thighs to ankles) and my genitalia as well.  

I started to take gabapentin 300mg 2x a day for the nerve pain but that has had a very minimal effect on the neuralgia. 

I also started to take Lysine and B12 Vitamins daily.

I was reading thru this post by @Seeker1960http://herpeslife.com/herpes-forum/discussion/7680/how-do-i-manage-hsv1-related-neuropathy,  and saw that some people switched from Valtrex to acyclovir.

Do i need to switch to acyclovir for the constant burning to cease? 

Has any of you had these kind of symptoms from genital herpes? If so, did they ever subside? If so, when? 

If any of you have expierienced them, how have you treated this symptoms ?

 

Again, any input is appreciated.

 

 

Edited by Almostcertain

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Puni

@Almostcertain I'm in the same situation you are in, I'm having constant prodrome symptoms, like burning at my penal head, scrotum burning and nerve pains. 

I hadhad consconstant headache which came down after taking acyvirol, now I'm sure that for me all these things are caused by hsv. And what a coincidence, my exposure happened on may 13th, I'll never forget that date, my life is upside down now, i can't even do day today chores :(

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WilsoInAus

@Almostcertain let's evaluate a few things here.

First, if you have now seen a negative IgG test for HSV from the partner you were with, then it is essentially game over. You can be pretty close to sure that she does not have HSV. If the previous partner to you was 12 or more weeks prior to the time of her test, then it is simply game over. Herpes was never a risk.

What you describe as prodrome is simply not the case. Prodrome refers to the symptoms that immediately proceed an outbreak by a number of hours. It usually consists of tingles, throbs and slight burns on the specific area that develops the cold sore. Sometimes there are other genitally focused symptoms and some issue down the legs but these are rarer. If there is no outbreak, then what you are experiencing, particularly in a continual sense, is not prodrome related to herpes. The maxim is if you find yourself waiting for a herpes outbreak, you probably do not have herpes. Herpes isn't waiting for a written invitation to outbreak upon infection.

It really isn't a surprise that antivirals are having no impact. They are very effective against herpes and not to experience a reduction in symptoms for an infected person is also rare. Constant burning is not a symptom of herpes.

A very common explanation for someone in your position with these symptoms is genital focused anxiety. The tension and the stress (I bet you are clenching your pelvic muscles all the time!) in your pelvis is straining nerves and muscles causing burning and tingling all of which is strongly accentuated in your mind.

Your symptoms will subside when you relax and release your tension.

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Almostcertain

@WilsoInAus

thanks for your response.

To what do you attribute the initial course of antivirals reducing my symptoms? 

If I go one or two days without daily AV's the burning increases exponentially ten fold, along with the stinging and pain. 

 

 

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Whyyyyy
Just now, Almostcertain said:

@WilsoInAus

thanks for your response.

To what do you attribute the initial course of antivirals reducing my symptoms? 

If I go one or two days without daily AV's the burning increases exponentially ten fold, along with the stinging and pain. 

 

 

I would recommend you speak to your doctor, Teri Warren or Anna Wald about your symptoms. :)

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Beachguy

First talk with your doctor. There are a few options like other nerve drugs or increasing gabapentin dosage.  There is always OTC include topical stuff. For some people their immune system response to H may result in aggravated nerves.  (pain, burning, etc) I know this first hand too. 

This is what my neurologist told me who is one of the top ones in my area. It gets better in time.

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LillianPanos

I too suffer nerve pain but I blame it on exercise.  Do you exercise?  Gives me relief.  I dont take anything for it its not that bad for me and is subsiding somewhat. The burning and tingling subsiding too. Finally.  Thus all suckers constant reminder.  But it could be worse. @Almostcertain my igg after a yr still didn't show hsv2.  Its been16 mos

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CanadianGuy

All the people saying that these aren't the signs of ghsv don't know what they're talking about. Lots of people have ghsv without the typical sores and only experience neuralgia. I literally experienced the exact same symptoms as you and am sure I have ghsv. I had my first igg 1 month post exposure which came back negative and my second igg 3 months post which came back indeterminate which also said that the common band of hsv was detected. Test recommended I get tested 14 weeks later but I have yet to get tested again since I spent over $300 for the first two tests and can't afford it at the moment. Needless to say, the fact the results of my second test say it found the common band of hsv shows that I am infected with the virus, it's just a matter of hsv1 or hsv2. Thoughts and prayers are with you as I know how painful these constant symptoms can be.

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