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Mantis

Very confused!!!

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I'm so confused! My IgM was positive yesterday and today I found out the IgG test came back that I am negative for HSV2 but showed evidence of IgG for HSV 1 (she said I needed to retest in 3 months).  I've never had ANY symptoms ever. So do I tell people I have genital herpes or do I tell them I just have cold sores virus?  I have no way of know if I have it on my mouth or below! What do I do??? 

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If you've never had any symptom I expect you prob have HSV1 from childhood and not genitally.

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9 minutes ago, hopeing said:

If you've never had any symptom I expect you prob have HSV1 from childhood and not genitally.

No I didn't ever have hsv 1 before (was tested in spring). This was a recent exposure. The ex had an outbreak on his genitalia so I got tested. No symptoms but positive for hsv 1 now so how do I know if it's cold sores or gHSV1 

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