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hopeful22

Excision BioTherapeutics Licenses New CRISPR Systems from UC Berkeley

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    Good find. It looks like Excision bought the rights from UC Berkeley to use CRISPR/CasX and CRISPR/CasY, in case there are any unforseen challenges with CRISPR/Cas9. They are continuing to use CRISPR/Cas9 on HIV and HSV, with the HIV clinical trials on track for 2018/4Q or 2019/1Q.

    Sounds like they're moving fast. Let's hope the HSV trials are right behind the HIV trials. We're talking humans!

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    Does this mean a cure from bio would take atleast 10 years to complete given no failure?

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    Well their pipeline has said 2019 or 2020 for human HSV2 trials for a long time now but reality might be later than that of course. Anyway its good news.
    I feel that the cure / treatment research isnt going so bad after all. So many options in different pipelines that seem to be able to reduce it to >2% days of viral shedding in people with recurrent outbreaks and CRISPR possibly coming after that with a full cure.

    From what I´ve gathered, a combination of Shingrix and Pritelivir might possibly make the virus close to a non factor while we wait for CRISPR. But dont take my word on that =).

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    Hi huys, does anyone think crispr would work for people with cmv or ebv?

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    2 hours ago, useless said:

    Hi huys, does anyone think crispr would work for people with cmv or ebv?

    It has the potential to work on any virus. All viruses have dna just like all other organisms. CRISPR has the ability to edit dna, which can disable or destroy, in this case, the virus.

    Edited by Cas9

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    16 hours ago, Voyager2 said:

    Good find. It looks like Excision bought the rights from UC Berkeley to use CRISPR/CasX and CRISPR/CasY, in case there are any unforseen challenges with CRISPR/Cas9. They are continuing to use CRISPR/Cas9 on HIV and HSV, with the HIV clinical trials on track for 2018/4Q or 2019/1Q.

    Sounds like they're moving fast. Let's hope the HSV trials are right behind the HIV trials. We're talking humans!

    @Voyager2 This is just shows how they keep pushing forward and things are getting better and better!

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    2 hours ago, Cas9 said:

    It has the potential to work on any virus. All viruses have dna just like all other organisms. CRISPR has the ability to edit dna, which can disable or destroy, in this case, the virus.

    I hope so cas9 thankyou.

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    2 hours ago, hopeful22 said:

    @Voyager2 This is just shows how they keep pushing forward and things are getting better and better!

    @hopeful22 After an interview with Dr. Bryan Cullen about 4 years ago, CNN reporter Dr. Sanjay Gupta said there were a lot of good ideas on the herpes front but not enough money. With Excision Bio, we are finally seeing what money can do.   

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    7 hours ago, useless said:

    Hi huys, does anyone think crispr would work for people with cmv or ebv?

    It's extremely effective against ebv. 95% there's a video on YouTube 

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    On 11/14/2017 at 12:15 AM, Voyager2 said:

    Good find. It looks like Excision bought the rights from UC Berkeley to use CRISPR/CasX and CRISPR/CasY, in case there are any unforseen challenges with CRISPR/Cas9. They are continuing to use CRISPR/Cas9 on HIV and HSV, with the HIV clinical trials on track for 2018/4Q or 2019/1Q.

    Sounds like they're moving fast. Let's hope the HSV trials are right behind the HIV trials. We're talking humans!

    Yes they seem to be working very efficiently. I'm rooting hard for their HIV gene editing candidates.  Success with that could be success for us.

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    On 11/14/2017 at 4:50 PM, Divon said:

    Well their pipeline has said 2019 or 2020 for human HSV2 trials for a long time now but reality might be later than that of course. Anyway its good news.
    I feel that the cure / treatment research isnt going so bad after all. So many options in different pipelines that seem to be able to reduce it to >2% days of viral shedding in people with recurrent outbreaks and CRISPR possibly coming after that with a full cure.

    From what I´ve gathered, a combination of Shingrix and Pritelivir might possibly make the virus close to a non factor while we wait for CRISPR. But dont take my word on that =).

    Thia is great any word on when Pritelivir will beavailable and is Shingrix available now.

     

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    On 14-11-2017 at 10:05 PM, useless said:

    Hi huys, does anyone think crispr would work for people with cmv or ebv?

    http://blogs.plos.org/speakingofmedicine/2016/08/04/crispr-puts-up-a-fight-against-persistent-herpesviruses-a-short-animation/

    In the video below they talk about a HCMV virus is this one you mean? 

    In 2016 a dutch group of scientists published a paper with results with CRISPR on the HSV virus.. Im gonna try to get in contact with them and ask them i've their is anything known about trails. 

     

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    Nietzsche thankyou for the video. Let me know what you find out when you contact them please.

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    1 hour ago, Nietzsche said:

    http://blogs.plos.org/speakingofmedicine/2016/08/04/crispr-puts-up-a-fight-against-persistent-herpesviruses-a-short-animation/

    In the video below they talk about a HCMV virus is this one you mean? 

    In 2016 a dutch group of scientists published a paper with results with CRISPR on the HSV virus.. Im gonna try to get in contact with them and ask them i've their is anything known about trails. 

     

    so basically crispr will work IF they can get into the hsv cells in the nerve system

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    7 hours ago, fixme1 said:

    so basically crispr will work IF they can get into the hsv cells in the nerve system

    This topic has always been a source of confusion for myself. I've heard two separate accounts on the issue of CRISPR's ability to eliminate the latent virus.

    1. Can't get CRISPR into the neuron
    2. The latent viral DNA is too tightly wound during dormancy, for CRISPR to be able to edit that DNA

    Let's look at the first reason. Here's a 2014 comment from the Update on HSV Resarch section of Dr. Cullen's (Duke University) website:
    "The big advantage of AAV is that you can get very high levels of virus—up to 10 billion infectious units per milliliter—and the Bloom lab has clearly shown, using an AAV that expresses green fluorescent protein (gfp), that he can infect essentially every single neuron in the trigeminal ganglia where HSV-1 establishes latency. The problem is that the AAV packaging size, that is the amount of DNA that it can fit into its viral capsid, is only ~4,600 bp."

    So he was able to get AAV (Adeno Associated Virus) into virtually every neuron. But of course they need to get CRISPR into the AAV first.
    In 2014, that was a problem because CRISPR from SP (
    Streptococcus pyogenes) bacteria, is too large to package into the AAV vector. Then, in 2015, Cullen's team determined that the CRISPR residing in the bacteria called SA (Staphylococcus aureus), was smaller than the CRISPR in SP and therefore it could be successfully packaged into the AAV.
    He sent that vector and some other vectors to Blooms Lab in Florida, to inject into mice to verify that CRISPR got into the neurons. It should have worked since:
    1. SA CRISPR could be packaged into the AAV
    2. AAV could infect virtually every neuron in the trigeinal ganglia

    But the results of those experiments were never realized because of funding issues. Dr. Cullen updated his website accordingly; i.e.
    " My laboratory has decided to terminate our research on the development of treatments for HSV infections due to a chronic lack of funds for this work. However, our previous collaborators, Dr. David Bloom at the University of Florida and researchers at Editas Medicine in Cambridge, MA, are continuing this work and should be contacted directly if you are interested. "

    Edited by Cas9

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    On 11/14/2017 at 4:05 PM, useless said:

    Hi huys, does anyone think crispr would work for people with cmv or ebv?

    It has better and easier chance of working against CMV, which is in the Liver or EBV, the blood.

    The only problem I see with EBV is that it actually has some retroviral activity, meaning that it does write itself into the host's genomic DNA.   It's a very small percentage that gets written in and I don't know if that sequence is randomly unique or generally conserved with EVERYONE.

    I don't know anything about CMV except that it infects the liver.  The liver is the only organ that regenerates itself like a champ and that's a good sign for a cure.

    The problem with HSV is that either crispr can't reach the area that infected. different region of body, AAV vector has different affinity so it doesn't go there. (various AAV vectors have different organ/target affinities)  AND/OR latent virus is physically hiding target/sequences that crispr enzymes need to see to unwind and cleave/edit.

    That's the thing that I don't know and I haven't seen in any study.  I'd like to see a study that used crispr on HSV and sequence/tested regions of an infected nerve/tract.  Does crispr effectively treat the entire PNS (peripheral nervous system) and fall short when it gets closer to the CNS bc of phsyiological/biochemical restrictions?   Does crispr reach everywhere and it's a matter of HSV DNA target sequences being unreachable. bc they're so tightly bound and crispr can't touch it or do anything to it.

    In the previous studies about crispr and HSV they're showed that when they used 1 target sequence that would remove 30% of viral DNA, using 2 target seqs removed/edited 50%, 3 seqs 60%+ and so on.   I don't know but this leads me to believe that cleaving one part of HSV loosens the bonds and reveals more of the virus so then the 2nd seq cleaves more, unravels it and so on.   Or something along these lines.  I'm not attached to wondering if it's being EXACTLY like this.

    So yeah, I want to see some CT scan-like dissection and analysis of where along the nerve HSV has been removed or not because I think that will provide some important insight.

    Otherwise, Idk, who knows if this will ever work for HSV.  In the grand scheme of things, does this really need to be cured?  don't get me wrong. I want this gone but that also affects nature's natural balance for overpopulation.   So yeah, I don't enjoy having herpes but I think it plays an important personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological role.  So who knows.  It'd be great to have it cured but I'm at a point where I just want to leave this body for the next chapter in the soul's journey.  I fucked up, stumbled and made a careless decision that got me HSV.  I'm learning from that mistake and moving forward.   If a cure comes along, I'll drop to my knees and cry with resounding joy.  If not, I'm still going to move forward and try not to cause any collateral suffering due to ego-driven, selfish motives.

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    13 minutes ago, Sanguine108 said:

    It has better and easier chance of working against CMV, which is in the Liver or EBV, the blood.

    The only problem I see with EBV is that it actually has some retroviral activity, meaning that it does write itself into the host's genomic DNA.   It's a very small percentage that gets written in and I don't know if that sequence is randomly unique or generally conserved with EVERYONE.

    I don't know anything about CMV except that it infects the liver.  The liver is the only organ that regenerates itself like a champ and that's a good sign for a cure.

    The problem with HSV is that either crispr can't reach the area that infected. different region of body, AAV vector has different affinity so it doesn't go there. (various AAV vectors have different organ/target affinities)  AND/OR latent virus is physically hiding target/sequences that crispr enzymes need to see to unwind and cleave/edit.

    That's the thing that I don't know and I haven't seen in any study.  I'd like to see a study that used crispr on HSV and sequence/tested regions of an infected nerve/tract.  Does crispr effectively treat the entire PNS (peripheral nervous system) and fall short when it gets closer to the CNS bc of phsyiological/biochemical restrictions?   Does crispr reach everywhere and it's a matter of HSV DNA target sequences being unreachable. bc they're so tightly bound and crispr can't touch it or do anything to it.

    In the previous studies about crispr and HSV they're showed that when they used 1 target sequence that would remove 30% of viral DNA, using 2 target seqs removed/edited 50%, 3 seqs 60%+ and so on.   I don't know but this leads me to believe that cleaving one part of HSV loosens the bonds and reveals more of the virus so then the 2nd seq cleaves more, unravels it and so on.   Or something along these lines.  I'm not attached to wondering if it's being EXACTLY like this.

    So yeah, I want to see some CT scan-like dissection and analysis of where along the nerve HSV has been removed or not because I think that will provide some important insight.

    Otherwise, Idk, who knows if this will ever work for HSV.  In the grand scheme of things, does this really need to be cured?  don't get me wrong. I want this gone but that also affects nature's natural balance for overpopulation.   So yeah, I don't enjoy having herpes but I think it plays an important personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological role.  So who knows.  It'd be great to have it cured but I'm at a point where I just want to leave this body for the next chapter in the soul's journey.  I fucked up, stumbled and made a careless decision that got me HSV.  I'm learning from that mistake and moving forward.   If a cure comes along, I'll drop to my knees and cry with resounding joy.  If not, I'm still going to move forward and try not to cause any collateral suffering due to ego-driven, selfish motives.

    "I want this gone but that also affects natures natural balance for overpopulation"  What does that mean???

    This virus plays no "important personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological role" or me, that's for sure. I also don't believe "I fucked up, stumbled and made a careless decision that got me hsv".
    It's simply a matter of getting infected with a virus. Nothing more than that.

    It's no more a "personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological " thing than getting the flu virus; i.e. Just because this virus persists, and also can infect the genital area doesn't change that fact.

    What Excision Bio is working on is a therapeutic/functional cure.

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    26 minutes ago, Cas9 said:

    "I want this gone but that also affects natures natural balance for overpopulation"  What does that mean???

    This virus plays no "important personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological role" or me, that's for sure. I also don't believe "I fucked up, stumbled and made a careless decision that got me hsv".
    It's simply a matter of getting infected with a virus. Nothing more than that.

    It's no more a "personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological " thing than getting the flu virus; i.e. Just because this virus persists, and also can infect the genital area doesn't change that fact.

    What Excision Bio is working on is a therapeutic/functional cure.

    I just hope they can do it. But a functional cure with daily use you mean ? Just like valtrex

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    Sanguine108 thankyou for the info. Hcmv can attack any organ from what I've read. Cause deafness and blindness.  It also causes fibromialgia.  Effects the brain too. But I hope a cure comes soon. In the video it showed that ebv was easier to get to than hcmv and hsv. But in the interview given the Dr  said its harder to get to ebv and hcmv than hsv because hsv is in one localised place (ganglion) so I'm confused about what the video showed and was said. Unless I just dont understand maybe ?

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    2 hours ago, moialbalushi said:

    I just hope they can do it. But a functional cure with daily use you mean ? Just like valtrex ? 

    No

    CRISPR doesn't involve daily use. It's not a pill. Do you know what CRISPR is and how it works?

    Edited by Cas9

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    1 hour ago, Cas9 said:

    1 -"I want this gone but that also affects natures natural balance for overpopulation"  What does that mean???

    2 -This virus plays no "important personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological role" or me, that's for sure. I also don't believe "I fucked up, stumbled and made a careless decision that got me hsv".
    It's simply a matter of getting infected with a virus. Nothing more than that.

    3 -It's no more a "personal-social-interpersonal-ego-spiritual and ecological " thing than getting the flu virus; i.e. Just because this virus persists, and also can infect the genital area doesn't change that fact.

    4 -What Excision Bio is working on is a therapeutic/functional cure.

    1 - aww c'mon I don't want to spell that one out.  Imagine you have a background in wildlife ecology and ponder that question.

    2 - For one, I'm not implying that anyone else has to believe that they 'fucked up' or slipped.  I'm expressing my personal stance and not projecting that on anyone else.   I could have avoided getting HSV but made the wrong decision.

    3 - I disagree.  Anyone can get the flu but it takes more intimate exposure and more serious decisions to get HSV.

    4 -lol, I don't know what a therapeutic/functional cure means with CRISPR and would like to know what that looks like.

     

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    1 hour ago, Sanguine108 said:

    1 - aww c'mon I don't want to spell that one out.à Imagine you haveàa background in wildlife ecology and ponder that question.

    2 - For one, I'm not implying that anyone else has to believe that they 'fucked up' or slipped.à I'm expressing my personal stance and not projecting that on anyone else.à àI could have avoided getting HSV but made the wrong decision.

    3 - I disagree.à Anyone can get the flu but it takes more intimate exposure and more serious decisionsàto get HSV.

    4 -lol,àI don't know what a therapeutic/functional cure means with CRISPR and would like to know what that looks like.

    à

    I know you personally feel that way but it's not necessary. I doubt you did anything wrong. Just the wrong place at the wrong time.

    A therapeutic/functional cure means that the latent virus is not eliminated but the replicated viruses coming from the latent viruses are eliminated. If that occurs in the neuron, which is where CRISPR will be placed, then there wont be any more OBs or contagiousness.

    Edited by Cas9

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    1 hour ago, Cas9 said:

    No

    CRISPR doesn't involve daily use. It's not a pill. Do you know how CRISPR is and how it works?

    To be honest I dont know how it is given to human body.

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