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Jay2255

Having baby with HSV- woman by IVF possible?

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    Jay2255

    Is it possible for an HSV2+ man to have a baby with an HSV- woman by IVF without transmitting?

    Is the male sperm already damaged at the DNA level? Is the sperm contaminated or can it be during ejaculation for IVF?

     

    Has there been any scientific study on this?

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    hopeing

    The gametes should be unaffected by HSV. It is only your nerve and skin cells that are affected.

    You shouldn't need full IVF, you just need uncontaminated sperm inserted into the cervix during ovulation.

    Best to ask a doctor for the official answer.

     

    Edited by hopeing

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    Jay2255

    Thanks. I, however, just found the below. :pensive:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9918316/

     

     

    RESULTS: Herpes simplex virus DNA was detected in 8 (3.1%) semen samples, 6 of which were collected during a herpes recurrence. Herpes simplex virus DNA was not detected in any of the 18 samples collected during acyclovir therapy.

     

    CONCLUSION: Herpes simplex DNA can be detected in semen, although it appears closely associated with clinical HSV reactivation. More detailed studies will be needed to assess the role HSV-2 in semen plays in transmission of infection.

    Edited by Jay2255

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    Scooby2112

    You do not have a risk of passing hsv to your potential baby.  Even if you infected the mother during intercourse that conceived.  

    The risk for babies to contract hsv to the fetus is when the mother contracts HSV in the final 4 months of her pregnancy.  This is because she had not built up antibodies and so the baby is unprotected.  Even then they can deliver via C section and the baby will be fine.  

    If she has hsv2 while pregnant her antibodies are passed through the placenta and offer temporary protection during g the birth.  

    If a mother can have HSV2 in her body so close to the uterus and not pass it.  You are very far away from that.  

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    WannaCry

    My mom had HSV her whole life - and while she was pregnant with me. I have suffered no ill effects from this.

    I'm not sure where you got the idea it will hurt the child outside of the situation that Scooby is describing above. Terri Warren and Anna Wald also have discussed at length HSV risks in pregnancy and it always has to do with initial infection occuring in the last months of the actual pregnancy.  So if you have fears about it, that's when you should be abstaining if you are that concerned.

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    Jay2255

    Does your mother HSV1 or HSV2? My concerns are:

     

    1. Infecting HSV- partner by IVF

    2. Infecting the baby or possible DNA damage to the child due to my sperm being damaged by he virus.

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    Scooby2112
    6 hours ago, Jay2255 said:

    Does your mother HSV1 or HSV2? My concerns are:

     

    1. Infecting HSV- partner by IVF

    2. Infecting the baby or possible DNA damage to the child due to my sperm being damaged by he virus.

    Herpes is not transmitted by sperm.  It is transmitted by skin to skin contact.  Yes there are studies that show virus in sperm and blood, but this is not where the virus lives or thrives so those particles are not able to transmit. this is why you can transmit herpes while using a condom (it's less able to transmit because you have covered part of the skin. But not all of the skin.  

    There have been no reports of babies suffering herpes as a result of a positive male partner.  Thousands of babies are born each year to HSV+ women with no damage.  Your sperm is not going to cause the baby to have HSV.  

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    Jay2255

    What about question #1  Infecting HSV- partner by IVF?

     

    Have there been any studies on this? Information online appears to be scant.

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    Scooby2112

    You don't get hsv from sperm.  Since that's the only thing going in from IVF I don't see how that would be possible. 

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    WilsoInAus
    21 minutes ago, Jay2255 said:

    What about question #1  Infecting HSV- partner by IVF?

     

    Have there been any studies on this? Information online appears to be scant.

    This is taking things to extreme and you need to get a grip here. You do not have HSV-2. You must think about your role modelling for other readers. Please focus on your maturity levels and what it means.

    A person with HSV-2, male or fermale, does not require IVF to get pregnant, the thought is entirely absurd. IVF is for infertility issues and herpes is not one of them.

    The IVF process works as follows:

    • semen is stimulated and through a high power microscope a strong looking swimmer is identified
    • his little tail is knocked off making collection easy
    • The sperm is sucked into a needle
    • In a separate dish an egg is awaiting and the sperm is inserted inside the egg
    • Usually about 3-6 are done and the strongest one or more are implanted into the mother a few days later.

    Role that any form of herpes has in this process?

    That would be zero.

    Edited by WilsoInAus

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    Jay2255

    WilsonInAus, I am not professing to have it but I’m asking a technical question in the instance that I do.

    I am still awaiting my results but I cannot conceive of anything else that would cause the symptoms I’ve been experiencing the past ~3 weeks.

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    WilsoInAus

    Not really, it is just a question out of irrational fear.

    You need to ask yourself why you magically have come up with herpes as some explanation to your symptoms. No one else can conceive of how you would have herpes.

    You are stressed and anxious.

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    Jay2255

    Yes I am stressed but I’m not wanting to debate my symptoms.  There is no way that all that I’ve exhibited is psychosomatic or stress induced.

    I am sitting on the train now still feeling tingling from the sock line to my toes and my fingers are  stiff and imprecise like an older man (never had that in my life),

    I am not sure how you can be so convinced of this but I am not wanting to debate that.

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    WilsoInAus

    Please look at yourself man, are you honestly saying that having your junk grabbed by a women would cause these symptoms? It is time to man up a bit here mate, take accountability for your actions and move on. 

    There is every way that these symptoms are stress induced through tension in various muscles. Please see you doctor for further assistance if your symptoms persist.

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    Jay2255

    Interesting. This provided some answers:

    https://www.seattlespermbank.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Seattle-Sperm-Bank-Donor-Catalog.pdf

    WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CMV

    CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, or CMV, is a member of the herpes virus family which includes cold sores, chicken pox and infectious mononucleosis. It is a common virus known to infect people from all populations and ages. In developed countries, 50%-85% of adults have been infected by age 40. Once a person becomes infected and passes the initial illness, the virus lies dormant in their body for the rest of their life with little risk of recurrent infection or reactivation. Unfortunately, there is no vaccine for CMV.

    In healthy adults and children, symptoms of an active CMV infection are usually mild and could be mistaken for a cold or the flu. The affected person should fully recover in a week or two with no lasting effects. During an active infection, the virus is shed in body uids, which means it can be contracted through exposure to urine, saliva, blood, tears, breast milk and semen.

    Couples in which one partner contracts the virus will typically pass it on to the other through kissing and intimate contact which results in both partners sharing the same CMV status and mutual, natural immunity. However, it is impossible to be certain of your CMV status without obtaining a blood test.

    WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT REGARDING PREGNANCY AND DONOR SPERM CHOICE?

    If a woman has never encountered CMV and has her first exposure during pregnancy, there is a 30%-40% chance of her fetus being infected as well. The majority of children who experienced a CMV infection before birth are healthy and normal. However, 10%-15% may have complications such as hearing loss, neurological abnormalities or decreased motor skills. Note that infants who are infected with CMV after birth rarely experience any long-term complications.

    To reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, any woman planning to use donor sperm to conceive should have her CMV status tested.

    WHAT TYPE OF CMV TESTING DO SPERM DONORS

    GO THROUGH?

    Donors are given an initial CMV screening to determine their CMV status. All donors with an active infection are barred from donating until the donor tests IgM negative. Any potentially affected vials are discarded.

    Donors are tested every 3-6 months for their CMV status.

    For more in-depth information on CMV, please consult your physician and refer to the CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/cmv/index. html) for more information.

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    hippiechick88
    6 hours ago, Jay2255 said:

    Interesting. This provided some answers:

    https://www.seattlespermbank.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Seattle-Sperm-Bank-Donor-Catalog.pdf

    WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CMV

    CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, or CMV, is a member of the herpes virus family which includes cold sores, chicken pox and infectious mononucleosis. It is a common virus known to infect people from all populations and ages. In developed countries, 50%-85% of adults have been infected by age 40. Once a person becomes infected and passes the initial illness, the virus lies dormant in their body for the rest of their life with little risk of recurrent infection or reactivation. Unfortunately, there is no vaccine for CMV.

    In healthy adults and children, symptoms of an active CMV infection are usually mild and could be mistaken for a cold or the flu. The affected person should fully recover in a week or two with no lasting effects. During an active infection, the virus is shed in body uids, which means it can be contracted through exposure to urine, saliva, blood, tears, breast milk and semen.

    Couples in which one partner contracts the virus will typically pass it on to the other through kissing and intimate contact which results in both partners sharing the same CMV status and mutual, natural immunity. However, it is impossible to be certain of your CMV status without obtaining a blood test.

    WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT REGARDING PREGNANCY AND DONOR SPERM CHOICE?

    If a woman has never encountered CMV and has her first exposure during pregnancy, there is a 30%-40% chance of her fetus being infected as well. The majority of children who experienced a CMV infection before birth are healthy and normal. However, 10%-15% may have complications such as hearing loss, neurological abnormalities or decreased motor skills. Note that infants who are infected with CMV after birth rarely experience any long-term complications.

    To reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, any woman planning to use donor sperm to conceive should have her CMV status tested.

    WHAT TYPE OF CMV TESTING DO SPERM DONORS

    GO THROUGH?

    Donors are given an initial CMV screening to determine their CMV status. All donors with an active infection are barred from donating until the donor tests IgM negative. Any potentially affected vials are discarded.

    Donors are tested every 3-6 months for their CMV status.

    For more in-depth information on CMV, please consult your physician and refer to the CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/cmv/index. html) for more information.

    I’m sorry, what did this provide you answers for? Are you thinking you have CMV? All this says is that CMV is another virus im the herpes family, then it repeats exactly what you’ve been told by people here (that the fetus is unlikely to contract unless the mother corrects in the last 4 months of pregnancy).

    Wilson is right. Physicians and folks who have experienced herpes are telling you it’s not that and to get checked for other things. You insist it’s herpes despite all scientific evidence and logic. 

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    Jay2255

    No I was not implying i think I have CMV,  I found this interesting for the sane reason as you said.

    As to my status,  am still awaiting my test results for herpes. I’ve done a full STD panel and all came back negative. 

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