Jump to content
World's Largest Herpes Support Group


  • Donate

    If Honeycomb has helped you, please help us by making a donation so we can provide you with even better features and services.

  • The Hive is Thriving!

    • Total Topics
      71,127
    • Total Posts
      481,013
  • 0_unsure-if-it-is-herpes.png

    Nervous about dating with herpes? Skip "the talk" and browse profiles here.

  • Posts

    • Herpesser
      Thanks God I found someone’s throat and tongue like me! I have the exact tongue( with the exact color change on the tongue) and the exact throat with white dots on it!!! I am very scared of it and sometimes I feel like I will be sick bc of my throat it makes me feel like hard to drink water, eat, talk HOWEVER the feeling goes away within 4-5 five days. Please someone help if knows anything abut this tongue and throat type!!!! I believe that throat lesions gives this color to our tongue :(
    • ddylan26
      Has anyone tried taking 2LHERP? Produced in Belgium  currently in clinical trial phase 4  medication is meant to improve immunity against HSV1 and HSV2
    • alphaCero
      Well, that's unusual, but not impossible. I've had HSV1 since childhood, and my IgG results will vary based on whether I'm taking anti-virals, but always have come out positive. I've known someone though who definitely had a cold sore, but never tested positive, so it's rare, but happens. It's possible he just carries a low count and transmitted to you via saliva but without direct oral sex, or that he doesn't have it and you had been a carrier for a long time and randomly had an outbreak right after having sex (unlikely), or some other random scenario. There's a reason why such a large part of the population is HSV1 positive - there are a lot of ways to get it, it's often asymptomatic, and most adults already have it. It's frustrating that we just don't have the resources to look deeply into these questions today. It seems like he's been pretty open to getting tested and hopefully educating himself along the way - that's at least something.
    • alphaCero
      It is so easy to stress over all kinds of symptoms, but generally speaking I'd say to trust your GP. They have the training, and they were there, so it's reasonable to believe them regarding your oral symptoms. I'd follow their advice and try to take care of yourself to be comforted and heal. In terms of your concerns about having Ghsv, a type-specific test for you and your partner can at lest tell whether either of you have a type I or II infection *somewhere*. The symptoms for hsv can be pretty variable and sometimes so mild that you wouldn't even notice, which holds true for men and women. If you don't have it, you can be thankful! If you do, you can be thankful the symptoms are so mild the possibility never even occurred to you until now! Remember that even if you have a positive test result of some kind, it's not conclusive where/when/by whom you might have been exposed. Just use the information you get to make informed decisions going forward. You're not alone no matter what the outcome, and every outcome is manageable. Be well
    • WarriorKing
      normally for most people hsv is lips and genitals, not tongue. fear can make you afraid of every little thing that you did or did not ever notice before and now you have an excess of fear. tongue irritation can occur for many reasons, none of which i am qualified to discuss. i suggest not shaving genital areas, trim hairs, don't upset the skin.  
Sign in to follow this  
Sanguine108

Herpes Cure in 2020

Recommended Posts

hk81

@Cas9 I think that those are very old beliefs that I have read occasionally in some articles of 1 decade ago. I also do not trust them too much. They assumed that the reason why the immune system is not reacting to the infection in the neurons is because the activity of these infected cells is too short to be detected. There are immune cells inside of the nervous system; but the activity of the immune system in the nervous system is not well known, so no one knows if the immune system would attack the infected neurons and what would happen in that case (as disrupting certain pathways inside of the nervous system can lead to severe impairments).

I reported that as an example of what is known about latency and detectability of infected cells in a latent stage. These concepts are common to other viruses. I remember to have read similar things about HPV. It creates latently infected cells in the basal epidermal layer; these cells produce a minimal activity and are not attacked by the immune system. They are much more accessible to the immune system than the HSV infected neurons, but still the immune system is not attacking them and it is not recognizing them as an external pathogen; even if it is able to recognize and attack HPV infected cells on the external epidermal layers (which are in a replication stage and more active).

The success of CRISPR lays in the possibility of discovering how the gRNA interacts with the DNA of the copies of HSV in the neurons and how this DNA is accessible for editing. I think that researchers of the above article have tried to gain more understanding of these processes, instead of using a "trial and error" approach (as in the development of vaccines). I'm trying to learn how to read this scientific literature with a critic eye to be able to understand what I can expect from these researches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
veagle

the latest article i got is december from harvard Med. ended with Dr Knipe said: “We still have a long way to go in ensuring hyperprecision and safety of new gene-editing tools so local editing could offer a safer, more limited first step,” Knipe said. 

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/herpes-achilles-heel

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hk81

Local = they will not transport the gRNA in the ganglia, but they will keep it locally in the area of the infection. This is probably the same approach that excisionBio wants to use. I do wonder how effective it can be, since the genital area has a large extension (will the gRNA reach all those cells?)

What is confusing is the fact that the scientific article that I have posted indicates some researches in the direction of editing the latent HSV copies. Can the local copies go into a latent stage? I don't know..

2 extracts from your article:

"Now, using human fibroblast cells infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV), researchers at Harvard Medical School have successfully used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to disrupt not only actively replicating virus but also the far-harder to reach dormant pools of the virus, demonstrating a possible strategy for achieving permanent viral control."

"However, Knipe cautions, the arch-challenge of delivering gene-editing therapy to neurons—where the virus hides and enters a state of dormancy—remains to be solved, Knipe added."

The interpretation can be misleading. I read it in this way:

- it is possible to edit the latent virus; it is indeed easier to edit the virus in a replicating stage
- they still have not studied how to bring the gRNA to the neurons; but if they can bring it there, it can edit those copies

My comments:

- if they studied the possibility of editing latent copies, I assume that their long-term target are the neurons. In short-term they can apply the therapy locally, to HSV in replication stage.
- why did they force HSV to go latent into fibroblast cells (by using a non-replicating engineered HSV)? Is it because it's possible to find latent HSV in fibroblasts (and they actually wanted to study this situation)? or because they want to mimic what happens in neurons? I assume that it's nearly impossible to have a cell culture of human neurons, while it is possible to have a cell culture of human fibroblasts.
- is it right to define the virus in the ganglia as "dormant pools of the virus"? wouldn't it reactivate from time to time to generate new viral particles and therefore going in a replicating stage in which the DNA is more exposed?
- Fred Hutch is working on the possibility of reaching the neurons and it seems that they have been successful in that. I do wonder why it is not mentioned in articles and there is no collaboration between research groups.

I always read this kind of scientific journalism with a critic eye; you never know who is writing the article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cas9

@hk81

In my comment, I stated:
" I don't believe the immune system would not attack the neuron."
That was mistake; i.e. I had modified the beginning of the sentence and forgot to modify the end, thus ending up with a double negative. So what I meant to say was:
" I don't believe the immune system would attack the neuron."
Just wanted to make that clear. I updated the comment accordingly.

OK, so I said that the immune system does not attack the actual neuron. The neuron may have some defensive properties against the virus, but that's not the same as the immune cells that float around in different areas of the body to fight infections.  Are you disagreeing with that?

Edited by Cas9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hk81

@Cas9
I have no idea, but I assume the same.. If that happened, there would be many more disabled people

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cas9
13 minutes ago, hk81 said:

@Cas9
I have no idea, but I assume the same.. If that happened, there would be many more disabled people

So what did you mean when you said: " I think that those are very old beliefs that I have read occasionally in some articles of 1 decade ago. "  ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hk81

It was not the main point of the discussion. Did I write that I believe in such an approach? I only referred to it because I wanted to point out that researchers have always been looking at the condition called latency, trying to demystify it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cas9
6 hours ago, hk81 said:

It was not the main point of the discussion. Did I write that I believe in such an approach? I only referred to it because I wanted to point out that researchers have always been looking at the condition called latency, trying to demystify it.

No, you did not write that you believed in such an approach, nor did I say you did. So I'm not sure what you are talking about.

You asked for input regarding your original comment and I responded (providing an explanation regarding the immune system attacking the neuron) where I thought you got it wrong. You then responded to my explanation (i.e. directly to me) by stating: "those are very old beliefs", which I took as meaning that my explanation was out of date.

Anyway, I think we should leave it as is since there seems to be some confusion.

Edited by Cas9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hk81

with "those are very old beliefs" I was not referring to your explanation, but to the approach of forcing the copies of HSV out of latency so that the immune system attacks/causes apoptosis of the neuron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.