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LifeTrax

Any progress in HSV cure research with Crispr/Cas9 in 2018?

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Patrick Henry
14 minutes ago, Cas9 said:

@Taintedgirl

I don't know what your knowledge of CRISPR is but here's a video providing a fundamental explanation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52jOEPzhpzc

 

I am sure Crispr will be able to cure it, in terms of delivering it in mass numbers I don't know, theoretically one day yes, and lots of advancement in other tech to cure it in Africa as a humanitarian effort, but I truly think we should try and get a grassroots effort together to try and do something huge with the technology, I am willing to do huge things for this cause, and the greatest technological race and the greatest humanitarian effort in the world, everyone has common goals on this. Getting them equipment and access is important. 

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Klps89
On 3/1/2018 at 7:21 PM, Taintedgirl said:

I know that everyone is hopeful about this but maybe we all need to take a step back and see what happens. Excision looks promising but how exactly is it supposed to enter our nerves. I want to be cured as much as the next person but I’m doubtful of the efficacy of this. I will take a vaccine that will protect others though because no one deserves this. 

That would work for me

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Patrick Henry
7 hours ago, Patrick Henry said:

I am sure Crispr will be able to cure it, in terms of delivering it in mass numbers I don't know, theoretically one day yes, and lots of advancement in other tech to cure it in Africa as a humanitarian effort, but I truly think we should try and get a grassroots effort together to try and do something huge with the technology, I am willing to do huge things for this cause, and the greatest technological race and the greatest humanitarian effort in the world, everyone has common goals on this. Getting them equipment and access is important. 

That is why I am saying open sourced is the answer, and yes advances need to happen for a rollout of a cure, for both to happen advancement needs to happen. To cure one person it is extremely likely that it will happen in the next 2 years utilizing Crispr. This is our generations Space race and helping the cause is needed to win and beat China. We are Americans ready to show that we are the greatest.

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MikeHerp

Regarding the original post, Chinese scientists have been tinkering with CRISPR on HSV recently.

http://hsvupdate.blogspot.kr/2018/03/research-focus-crispr-cas9-system.html

It's not for using CRISPR as a solution in itself to HSV, but rather examining as a tool to help develop other solutions, like attenuated vaccines based on HSV whcih has been modified with CRISPR.

So there is stuff going on.  I don't think it's dead in the water.

In general, there have been some very rapid advances in CRISPr over the last few months, including advances to make it more accurate.  That's very important.  The CRISPR solution being investigated by ExcisionBio would require CRSIPR/Cas 9 to be expressed in human cells continuously.  Until recently, I had thought that would be a losing proposition in general as people have been worried about CRISPR doing too much off target damage even during a short term. 

But with the speed at which advances are being made in CRSIPR accuracy, now i'm not so sure.  I think there's a fighting chance to maybe develop CRISPR to the point where even indefinite presence might be tolerable.  We'll see. 

CRISPR breakthroughs are happening all the time and the three main CRISPR focused companies are attracting a lot of capital.

 

 

 

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moialbalushi
12 minutes ago, MikeHerp said:

Regarding the original post, Chinese scientists have been tinkering with CRISPR on HSV recently.

http://hsvupdate.blogspot.kr/2018/03/research-focus-crispr-cas9-system.html

It's not for using CRISPR as a solution in itself to HSV, but rather examining as a tool to help develop other solutions, like attenuated vaccines based on HSV whcih has been modified with CRISPR.

So there is stuff going on.  I don't think it's dead in the water.

In general, there have been some very rapid advances in CRISPr over the last few months, including advances to make it more accurate.  That's very important.  The CRISPR solution being investigated by ExcisionBio would require CRSIPR/Cas 9 to be expressed in human cells continuously.  Until recently, I had thought that would be a losing proposition in general as people have been worried about CRISPR doing too much off target damage even during a short term. 

But with the speed at which advances are being made in CRSIPR accuracy, now i'm not so sure.  I think there's a fighting chance to maybe develop CRISPR to the point where even indefinite presence might be tolerable.  We'll see. 

CRISPR breakthroughs are happening all the time and the three main CRISPR focused companies are attracting a lot of capital.

 

 

 

Awww. Now its getting hotter in china 

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Nietzsche
4 hours ago, MikeHerp said:

Regarding the original post, Chinese scientists have been tinkering with CRISPR on HSV recently.

http://hsvupdate.blogspot.kr/2018/03/research-focus-crispr-cas9-system.html

It's not for using CRISPR as a solution in itself to HSV, but rather examining as a tool to help develop other solutions, like attenuated vaccines based on HSV whcih has been modified with CRISPR.

That is great news certainly since China planning to speed up drug approvals.

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LifeTrax

What's the current status with CRISPR-Cas9? I hear a new CRISPR-Cas3 approach is also promising. Which is more likely to cure herpes and hit the market sooner? Here is a recent article on Cas3:

https://www.sciencealert.com/newly-invented-application-of-crispr-could-actually-cure-herpes-one-day

I know they are working on curing Oral herpes caused by HSV-1, but will any of these approaches cure genital herpes caused by HSV-1?

Edited by LifeTrax

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IAmDesperate

@LifeTrax, do you have any other news from CRISPR-Cas3? Please keep us updated if you do. Thank you.

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sdl35
November 18, 2019 12:00 ET | Source: Excision BioTherapeutics
 
 

Oakland, CA, Nov. 18, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- At the 2019 International Symposium on NeurovirologyExcision BioTherapeutics, a gene therapy company focusing on curing viral infectious diseases, presented multiple preclinical abstracts, which revealed that gene editing strategies are promising tools for eradicating viral genomes and possible cures for HSV and JC virus-induced progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Entitled “Inhibition of HSV-1 Replication In-Vitro and In-Vivo by a Gene Editing Strategy,” and CRISPR/Cas9 System as an Agent for Inhibition of Polyomavirus JC Infection,” the studies demonstrate the power of gene editing as a potential curative therapy.

There are no current effective therapies for JC virus-induced progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Similarly, patients with HSV have limited treatment options. Researchers working with collaborators at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) demonstrated the ability to remove JC Virus and HSV from cell lines and animals using CRISPR, a powerful gene editing technology. The teams combined multiple guide RNAs (gRNAs) to cut multiple locations to deactivate the viral genomes. The team used AAV9, AAV6 and AAV2 mediated delivery of CRISPR/Cas9, which led to viral suppression. 

“For the first time, the team led by Drs. Jennifer Gordon, Ilker Sariyer, and Hassen Wollebo at Temple, have demonstrated proof-of-concept in cell culture using CRISPR to suppress these devastating infections,” said Dr. Kamel Khalili, Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of the Center for Neurovirology at LKSOM and principal scientific advisor at Excision BioTherapeutics. “Excision’s technology leverages multiple gRNAs to generate multiple excision sites within viral genomes, thereby deactivating viral infections.”

The scientists at LKSOM who are associated with Excision BioTherapeutics were the first to demonstrate a functional cure for HIV in animals, in collaboration with Dr. Howard Gendelman and his team at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, published in Nature Communications in 2019

“The Excision team envisions a future where the world’s most devastating viral diseases have functionally curative treatments,” commented Daniel Dornbusch, Excision’s CEO. He continued, “Both JC virus-induced PML and HSV require vastly improved therapies to treat many patients with significant unmet needs.”

Excision is developing CRISPR-based gene therapies delivered by a single intravenous infusion to cure viral infectious diseases. The company’s lead compound, EBT-101, a treatment for HIV, will enter human clinical trials in 2020. 

http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/11/18/1948896/0/en/CRISPR-Gene-Editing-Eliminates-Herpes-Simplex-Virus-and-JC-Virus-Demonstrating-Feasibility-of-a-Potential-Functional-Cure.html

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sdl35

This article has to do with gene-editing progress not hsv directly...

Encouraging early results from first human CRISPR gene therapy trials

Promising preliminary data from one of the first human trials testing the safety and efficacy of a CRISPR gene therapy has just been revealed. Although it is too early to evaluate long-term effects, the initial reports are impressively successful for two patients with severe genetic blood diseases.

Until February of this year, when pharmaceutical companies CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex began a large global trial into a treatment called CTX001, no human outside of China had been officially treated with a CRISPR-based gene editing therapy.

CTX001 was developed to treat two types of inherited blood disease, beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Both conditions are caused by a mutation in a single gene and the treatment involves engineering a patient's stem cells with a single genetic change designed to raise levels of fetal hemoglobin in red blood cells.

The newly announced data from the first two patients treated with CTX001 is nothing short of extraordinary. The first patient was treated with the CRISPR therapy at the beginning of 2019 for transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia. The patient’s illness was so severe they required around 16 blood transfusions every year. Nine months after the single CTX001 treatment the patient was completely independent of the need for blood transfusions and their total hemoglobin levels were near normal.

The second patient, treated for sickle cell disease, demonstrated similar remarkable responses to the one-off gene therapy treatment. Four months after the CTX001 infusion the patient’s total hemoglobin levels had returned to normal and many of the disease symptoms had disappeared.

“We are very encouraged by these preliminary data, the first such data to be reported for patients with beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease treated with our CRISPR/Cas9 edited autologous hematopoietic stem cell candidate, CTX001,” says Samarth Kulkarni, CEO of CRISPR Therapeutics. “These data support our belief in the potential of our therapies to have meaningful benefit for patients following a one-time intervention.”

Both patients did suffer from a small number of serious adverse events following the CTX001 treatment, however, the researchers conducting the trial are confident none of these side effects were related to the gene therapy. Instead, these side effects seem primarily related to a pre-CTX001 treatment involving the elimination of pre-existing mutated bone marrow cells to enable the healthy CRISPR-edited cells to reproduce.

It is certainly very early days for the research, and a number of patients are yet to be enrolled and treated in this current trial. Both the beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease trials plan to enroll up to 45 patients, with a two-year follow-up planned to evaluate safety and efficacy. The Phase 1/2 open-label trials precede larger Phase 3 trials required for ultimate market approval, so these new therapies are still at least a decade away from clinical implementation.

Still, these initial results are as positive as one could hope for at this stage, establishing CRISPR gene editing as having exciting curative potential in human subjects. Whether the treatment holds for extended periods of time, and demonstrates longer safety profiles is yet to be determined. But, these early results are leaving researchers cautiously optimistic.

“The data we announced today are remarkable and demonstrate that CTX001 has the potential to be a curative CRISPR/Cas9-based gene-editing therapy for people with sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia,” says CEO of Vertex, Jeffrey Leiden. “While the data are exciting, we are still in the early phase of this clinical program.”

https://newatlas.com/medical/encouraging-early-results-first-human-crispr-gene-therapy-trials/

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JHenry

I saw an article this week where Anthony Fauci of the NIH said they were optimistic about a vaccine for HIV in approximately the next two years.  

I am thinking and hoping,  this night translate and bode well into HSV treatments and vaccines as well?   Would that be a safe assumption or simple well wishing?  

Fingers crossed,                                                                                                                         Henry 

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