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TravisSmith

Theravax, Gen 003, Contacted Pritelivir supplier, & more

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TravisSmith

I take Valtrex daily to prevent my wife from getting it. I also use a self-created acycliovir cream an hour before sex.... And, mix Truvada with lubricant to help as well (it has shown to help reduce chances of transmission). 

Anyway, I was in touch with Rational vaccines (via phone) in Q4 of last year (they were in the Caribbean). Anyway, they have now gone MIA (feel free to Google it). So, I doubt that will be an option anymore.

Gen 003 was cancelled.

Pritelivir won't be available for a while here in the USA. However, I can get it from a company in Germany, and it will be expensive. If someone is intersted, message me, and we can get a bulk discount. Still it'll be about $9,000 each for a 4 year supply. I will put it on a credit card and make payments. 

That's all my research so far. Hope this helps someone!

 

 

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Piper

where in Germany are you getting it from?  How are you getting into the USA? 

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MikeHerp

sounds like a scam.  I wouldn't send money.  

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kill.hsv(not Kenny)
Posted (edited)

Pritelevir is definitely not available in Germany. It does not have a license, nor is it possible to buy it anywhere. Beware of this scam.

Edited by kill.hsv(not Kenny)

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