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Jimmyjimmyhuapua

Participants in Rogue Herpes Vaccine Research Take Legal Action

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Jimmyjimmyhuapua

Yeah rational vax will have more trouble.. 

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/893989

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moialbalushi

I cant see the article. Anyone Can capture it and post it here ? 

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PrettyUglyGirl

I heard about that too and it bummed me out. I hope to hear promising news soon.

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    • hhh
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      I am Dr Ofua Ofure a traditional herbal doctor i have traditional herbal medications for GENITAL HERPES 1&2 ,WARTS HSV,CANCER and DIABETIC, and my herbal medicine its made from some special African roots and herbs its cures you permanently it has been tested and trusted.
      for more info about my work visit me on
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      https://herpescure969.wordpress.com/
      http://thegreatherbalhealinghome.blogspot.com/
    • Nett
      By Nett
      www.community-labs.eu
       
      First of let me tell you the intention and why this can be a great project, good investment and eventually something we could all benefit from.
      A unique way of effort for funding our mutual problem with the ETH ERC20 Token.
      Labcash is my idea born by our mutual friend HSV.
      Just by looking at this forum I have noticed how much people complain about HSV funding (justified reason) and the institutions ignoring us at every possible step of the way.
         
            When I need a doctor I never use public health because it would take me 6 months to get in line, instead I go to a private doctor and get all done in 30 minutes.
      The same principle applies when we want something to be done such as HSV research, we can order a private laboratory that would conduct studies on our behalf without restrictions.
      Raising funds to start/continue and eventually complete a study is difficult especially when we know that repeated funding is necessary.
      The solution is offered by the blockchain and crypto assets.
      You may or may not be familiar with cryptocurrency however it has massive advantages such as competing against other cryptocurrencies on an exchange that directly benefits us as the value of the Token goes up gives us more investment power and not only that but we are able to make our own acyclovir product that will not feed the big pharma but our chosen investment lab and our token.
      The possible side effect is the volatility in the crypto market that would make the token more valuable than the initial purchase price making some extra profit for token holders (not the goal but a good one).
      Simplified:
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      2. Signing the contract with the laboratory for drug development (Pivot park in the Netherlands is the chosen default).
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      4. Production and packaging of acyclovir on the lowest possible price for packaging, shipping, and reinvestment to the blockchain.
      5. Sales and returns in the blockchain for future research.
      6. Eventual new drugs will be discovered thanks to passive funding/market exploitation.

      TECH
      Token name: Labcash
      Platform: ERC20
      Ticker: LCH
      If you are interested in participating in the project visit www.community-labs.eu or send an email on info@community-labs.eu for future clarification.
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    • destroyhsv
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      If you’ve followed this ASP2151 thread, you may know that I’ve been taking amenamevir (Amenalief) for about two months. In these two months, I have had absolutely no symptoms and no side effects to speak of. I’m ordering blood work soon to confirm that there are no major changes in important biomarkers (kidney, liver, heart, etc.) but I haven’t experienced any side effects that I could observe myself (headaches, diarrhea, insomnia, mood changes etc.) However, there is no data about the effectiveness of valacyclovir + amenamevir on reducing HSV recurrences. Two months of being on this combination is not enough to tell how well it works.
      As a community, what we need is a functional cure. There’s a lot of excitement surrounding pritelivir in this regard. Pritelivir, like amenamevir, is a new drug inhibits the HSV helicase-primase complex. This is a different target than valacyclovir, which is why combining the two has major potential to be a functional cure. If you’ve read Josh Bloom’s article on the possibility of using pritelivir and valacyclovir together as a sort of HIV-like cocktail, then you’ve probably realized this combo is the only way in the foreseeable future that we will have a functional cure.
      Here’s the reality of the situation.
      There will not be a vaccine in the foreseeable future (barring a miracle that allows GEN-003 to continue. I wouldn’t count on that).
      There will not be a CRISPR treatment in the foreseeable future.
      The only HSV drug that is going through clinical trials (past pre-clinical) is pritelivir. That means that aside from amenamevir and pritelivir, there will not be any new drugs on the market for at least ten years.
      You are not getting much help from the pharmaceutical companies. It’s the truth. Many people here are already aware of this. Look at the HSV pipeline. Other than the helicase-primase inhibitors, there is little to no progress being made, and the failure rate is incredibly high.
      If you want, you can wait ten years hoping that the pharmaceutical companies come out with something. The only alternative is to conduct our own trials and gather some data.
      There are plenty of drugs/supplements with studies that have some evidence to support their use in preventing HSV recurrences, but there’s not much consensus on whether they actually improve anything. A lot of them have been tested in animals, but not in humans for the purpose of reducing HSV recurrences. Others have been tested in early-stage trials with very small sample sizes and don’t achieve statistical significance, even if the results are promising:
      L-Glutamine
      Propranolol
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      Lithium
      Lactoferrin
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      Some people have also speculated that diet changes (ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.) also lead to dramatic improvement in symptoms. There is plenty of reason to be skeptical about these claims, especially when they only come from a small number of people. The sample size simply isn’t large enough.
      And, of course, there’s a new drug that we know to be a strong inhibitor of HSV replication: amenamevir. Just as famciclovir has the same effect on HSV as valacyclovir, amenamevir has the same effect on HSV as pritelivir. And, as some of you know, amenamevir is approved in Japan and can be purchased online.
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      Clearly, to achieve a functional cure, valacyclovir is not enough. But when combined it with other drugs/supplements/diets, it could achieve a functional cure or at least eliminate all outbreaks (which all but guarantees a very low level of shedding). Hypothetically, valacyclovir might reduce the average number of outbreaks per year from 3 to 1. Taking amenamevir in combination with valacyclovir might reduce that number to .5. Taking glutamine with amenamevir and valacyclovir might reduce that number to .2 (this is just a hypothetical example). Many of these combos may have a synergistic effect, meaning that using both drugs together would have a stronger effect than the effects of each individual drug combined. And how will we actually figure this out? By doing our own clinical trial.
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