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Eradicatethefuckouttahsv

Antibiotics against herpes?

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Divon

Why has noone commentrd here? I mean not saying its a cure but its worth talking about at least.

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Gina810

Antibiotics fight only bacteria. HSV is a virus, thus taking antibiotics do nothing to fight the virus, but instead cause potential harm by way of breaking down the immune system 

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Eradicatethefuckouttahsv
2 hours ago, Gina810 said:

Antibiotics fight only bacteria. HSV is a virus, thus taking antibiotics do nothing to fight the virus, but instead cause potential harm by way of breaking down the immune system 

"Antibiotics are a key defence against bacterial pathogens, but now evidence suggests they might beuseful against viral ones, too"

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stronghands87
3 hours ago, Gina810 said:

Antibiotics fight only bacteria. HSV is a virus, thus taking antibiotics do nothing to fight the virus, but instead cause potential harm by way of breaking down the immune system 

Why do people comment before they even read articles?

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Gina810

Natural antibiotics derived from whole foods  can be great, however pharmaceutical antibiotics absolutely destroy the human immune system/(good gut bacteria).

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fixme1
14 hours ago, Gina810 said:

Natural antibiotics derived from whole foods  can be great, however pharmaceutical antibiotics absolutely destroy the human immune system/(good gut bacteria).

true, i had them for acne and now most anti biotics dont help me much.

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luisjk

I already posted here when I am in pb constate tomo azithromycin 1g for five days. I am without pb for mt tem.I have done for exprriencia propria

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Trace67
On 4/23/2018 at 10:38 AM, fixme1 said:

true, i had them for acne and now most anti biotics dont help me much.

That's a load of crap. One can only assume that you take antibiotics for things that you don't really have. After all, you're in a herpes forum, and you don't have herpes. Enough said.

:rolleyes:

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Trace67
On 4/22/2018 at 2:28 AM, Gina810 said:

Antibiotics fight only bacteria. HSV is a virus, thus taking antibiotics do nothing to fight the virus, but instead cause potential harm by way of breaking down the immune system 

Lol, You should read the article. I wouldn’t be too excited though. First, most of the mice were treated before infection, and it may not work the same way in humans. Also, it's not very likely that a doctor would prescribe antibiotics for herpes as the toll on your gut and body would likely be worse than the disease (herpes) that you're treating. The good news is that the mechanism by which it works may one day help them come up with a new class of selective antibiotics that can target viruses without the collateral damage to the gut. Obviously, this is decades away. I would imagine they would target something like the Flu first as that could save a ton of lives and possibly be used in its current form and get faster approval.

 

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