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MikeHerp

New Article in Mens' Health on Keith Jerome's Herpes Cure Research

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MikeHerp

New article highlighting Keith Jerome's work in Men's Health Mag: https://www.menshealth.com/health/a26306319/herpes-cure-gene-editing/

I posted this on the donation thread, but I think it's also worthwhile to give it a separate thread. 

There are some interesting stats thrown out in this one.  Some ofthe stats may have been lost in translation, in part due to sloppy journalisn, but it's still very good that Jerome's work is getting increasing attention, including from mainstream media.

The point is that, Dr. Jerome's work has been progressing.  If you've been follwing his work, this is good stuff.

Please keep in mind that our community has been doing a fund raiser for Jerome's research. There's a thread about it on this site and the donation link is in my signature below. We've raised over $10,000 already.  Please help us, this is a serious and new effort that is showing promise. They have essentially been able to partially cure mice by deleting a portion of their latent HSV.  No other technology has been able to touch latent HSV--the source of the infection.

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Hopefullyhopeless

Going to read now, then fall back into shadows. Hopefully we all can be clinical trial subjects soon

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Sls1983

This is a great article and very promising, and great to be out there in main stream media :ok_hand:

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Lost-hope

@RNY18 That was months ago.. That let’s us know how quickly things can change and the work that’s continually being done that we we have no clue about what’s going on day to day

this new article should give us all a glimmer of hope 

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floydmonk

Thank you! That was a very promising read, I've forgotten how much progress has occurred. If they are already at 90% efficacy they should move along with human trials, but it makes sense that they want to do the best job they can before getting regulators involved.

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fixme1

donated :) glad theres people like him sticking to finding a fix 

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Miss Horne
13 hours ago, MikeHerp said:

New article highlighting Keith Jerome's work in Men's Health Mag: https://www.menshealth.com/health/a26306319/herpes-cure-gene-editing/

I posted this on the donation thread, but I think it's also worthwhile to give it a separate thread. 

There are some interesting stats thrown out in this one.  Some ofthe stats may have been lost in translation, in part due to sloppy journalisn, but it's still very good that Jerome's work is getting increasing attention, including from mainstream media.

The point is that, Dr. Jerome's work has been progressing.  If you've been follwing his work, this is good stuff.

Please keep in mind that our community has been doing a fund raiser for Jerome's research. There's a thread about it on this site and the donation link is in my signature below. We've raised over $10,000 already.  Please help us, this is a serious and new effort that is showing promise. They have essentially been able to partially cure mice by deleting a portion of their latent HSV.  No other technology has been able to touch latent HSV--the source of the infection.

Its not very often we hear from Dr Keith Jerome so this is wonderful news, I like the fact that he mentioned that he believes a cure is possible in his life time.  Of course there are never any guarantees but he also mentiones in this short video that he believes a cure is inevitable.

https://vimeo.com/56658001

I will be donating again in a couple of days, please donate if you can and spread the word on social media. Thank you ❤️

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Miss Horne
On 2/13/2019 at 8:26 AM, Hopefullyhopeless said:

Going to read now, then fall back into shadows. Hopefully we all can be clinical trial subjects soon

Indeed, if all goes well and is safe for humans I think Dr Jerome should offer the first shot to @MikeHerp :D

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Miss Horne

The way I feel today, Dr Jerome could test it on me now without doing any  further research :D

Edited by Miss Horne

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MikeHerp
4 hours ago, Miss Horne said:

Indeed, if all goes well and is safe for humans I think Dr Jerome should offer the first shot to @MikeHerp :D

In my butt! Lol 

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MikeHerp

I do think that this stuff will get us to the finish line. The only question is whether it will be a partial cure or effectively a functional cure.

i know Jerome gives the usual disclaimers about trials still needing some time to commence, but I believe we aren’t too far off. And once trials start, it’s going to be a fun ride.

 

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Lost-hope

Being that Dr Jerome revealed some new information in this latest  Men’s health article , how soon if anyone can make a guess will it be before there’s  a medical pub with those actually findings and #s 

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Miss Horne
8 hours ago, MikeHerp said:

I do think that this stuff will get us to the finish line. The only question is whether it will be a partial cure or effectively a functional cure.

i know Jerome gives the usual disclaimers about trials still needing some time to commence, but I believe we aren’t too far off. And once trials start, it’s going to be a fun ride.

 

Functional cure I hope :)

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MikeHerp
23 minutes ago, Miss Horne said:

Functional cure I hope :)

I think therer's a good chance of that.  In the 2016 study, even disruption of 2-4% of HSV in mouse neurons led to observable slower replication of the virus, even if the effect wasn't statistically significant. 

From that, it sounds like even 10% disruption, could lead to a tangible therapeutic benefit.

I don't know exactly what would be the threshold for a "functional" cure.  It's been hypothesized in research papers that somebody who has 10,000 copies of the virus or less, would be unable to infect others.

Jerome said that they are aiming for removal for 99.9% or perhaps even all latent HSV, but "there may be intermediate success along the way".

 

 

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Miss Horne

Did anybody know that his middle name is Robert?

Dont know why I’m posting this, I’ve become a bit obsessed with Keith I guess :heart_eyes:

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Miss Horne

I see that Dr Jerome has applied for a grant to study hsv until 2023. He’s made pretty impressive progress in the last couple of years so let’s say all goes well, would his method take as long as it takes to get a new drug approved?

The new drug route takes what 15 plus years and I know that gene editing is something completely different and it might even be too dangerous to insert into humans.

I guess what I’m asking here is do people think that this would be tested like a drug or a vaccine? Vaccines can get approved quicker than drugs can’t they? (I know it depends on the severity of the condition/illness).

Does my question even make sense? :giggle:

Edited by Miss Horne

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MikeHerp

It doesn't necessarily have to take 15 years.  15 years is more like the timeline which includes drug discovery.

Once things go into human trials, it could take as little as 5 to 6 years.

There are reasons to proceed cautiously.  But the FDA has protocols in place for evaluating this new technology and they seem to be open to it.

I suspect this will be quicker than people realize.  But, it will still take some time.

Once things go into human trials, if the results are good, it could be quite fun to follow it.  If it is shown to be effective, and the first reports from the early stages indicate that people are partly or mostly cured, I think that in of itself, will make having this condition a bit more tolerable while we wait for it to be commercialized.  

That's just my thought.  

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Cas9

@Miss Horne @MikeHerp

I agree with Mike. A typical trial is 2 -3 years per phase. I've always thought around 7 - 10 years if all goes well; funding, test results etc,,

On the other hand, I'm not sure how the process would run given that it's gene editing; whether it would affect the phase time line.

You guys are pretty young so even if it took ten years you'll still have decades of being herpes free. Hell, I am not likely to be herpes free for many years. I might not even be around, but I'm still excited about the prospect of getting rid of this virus.

Be patient, great progress is being made!

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JHenry

Cas9, you and I are in the same boat.  I’ll be 67 on my next birthday and in spite of possibly not being around to celebrate when the war is won, I still remain optimistic for  everyone infected.  It’s just a matter of “when”.

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MikeHerp

The prophylactic vaccine trial by GSK took 8 years and they were still not done with it.  That's because it takes time to see whether it works--it's a matter of many people having sex over time and that just takes a lot of time.  

A shedding study is quicker, so therapeutic vaccines are quicker to test.  5-6 years I think.  Note that there was a study conducted last year that showed that there's a high correlation between shedding and outbreaks, suggesting that it might not even be necessary to track outbreaks, measuring shedding may be enough.

It's unclear what they would be proving in case of a gene editing technique.  I think shedding would be a part of it.  But what else, if anything, I don't know.

Anyway, it doesn't necessarily have to take a long time like the GSK prophylactic trials.  

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moialbalushi
9 hours ago, MikeHerp said:

The prophylactic vaccine trial by GSK took 8 years and they were still not done with it.  That's because it takes time to see whether it works--it's a matter of many people having sex over time and that just takes a lot of time.  

A shedding study is quicker, so therapeutic vaccines are quicker to test.  5-6 years I think.  Note that there was a study conducted last year that showed that there's a high correlation between shedding and outbreaks, suggesting that it might not even be necessary to track outbreaks, measuring shedding may be enough.

It's unclear what they would be proving in case of a gene editing technique.  I think shedding would be a part of it.  But what else, if anything, I don't know.

Anyway, it doesn't necessarily have to take a long time like the GSK prophylactic trials.  

Can you give me a link for that vaccine please ? First time I hear about it.

Thank you

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MikeHerp
4 hours ago, moialbalushi said:

Can you give me a link for that vaccine please ? First time I hear about it.

Thank you

Just google GSK herpes vaccine.  

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Malcolm

Does anyone know what kind of endonuclease he achieved 90% elimination? I've always said, ZFNs are the go with HSV. Small, light, and hard-coded. Cas-9 is fantastic for prototyping and research but clunky for end-user therapy.

Edited by Malcolm

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