Jump to content
World's Largest Herpes Support Group
Sign in to follow this  
farnsworth

Realistically how far away is a cure?

Recommended Posts

RNY18

https://www.precisionvaccinations.com/herpes-simplex-virus-2-hsv2-vaccines-may-benefit-prime-and-pull-approach?s=en&utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=pv-consumer-general&utm_medium=email&utm_content=[ _currentdayname]

Why Did Heres Vaccines Stall in Phase 2 ?

"..Having the antibody circulating in the blood alone is not enough to protect against genital herpes infection, and a different strategy is needed to deliver the protective antibody in the future, Dr. Iwasaki said, in a related commentary.

These results may explain why herpes vaccines that have been developed to date have not worked, say the researchers. 

The findings also support a different approach to vaccination, such as “prime and pull,” which Dr. Iwasaki’s Yale lab has been investigating...."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Focri
Posted (edited)
On 6/19/2019 at 10:43 AM, Tired of waiting said:

No worries, we are all out searching for any piece of new information from the corners of web that may offer some kind of path forward and or hope. Based on your profile you are new to this and are probably spending a lot of time chasing leads.

After a while you will be able to spot the bogus cures Vs  real research. The bogus cures generally have the same repeating patterns, of being  based loosely on science, pseudo science and will pile on emotionally gut wrenching testimonials of people being cured and with out fail will quote the word health organization or CDC in a statement of impact of the disease.  What you will not find is anything resembling or meeting the standards of scientific or medical studies and in the reporting of test results.

Don't give up looking there could be an obscure research lab or college out there that is working on things that may be helpful for our situation.

 

Thanks

 

Excellent, you are very right, and It really sucks we’re all out there looking up cures :(.  Some days i just need something to help me get to sleep after a rough day. - and that is why i appreciated you note about an obscure lab or college doing research.  They could have studies breaking ground now, or being enlightened of a new way forward at this very second.  :/

 

slowly, i’m learning to accept as i read more and more from this community.  I’m almost mid 30s, no family of my own, but have been working to get life in order so I could feel like I could support one... then this happened right as things were actually beginning to happen for the better.  I guess I’m just hoping i wont become numb and fade away, but will instead, stay active and have faith that there is someone also positive out there who I will meet, and not too late to have a chance to bring a couple kids into the world.

wow, sorry about length. Thanks again for the message and positivity.

 

Edited by Focri
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tired of waiting
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Focri said:

 

slowly, i’m learning to accept as i read more and more from this community.  I’m almost mid 30s, no family of my own, but have been working to get life in order so I could feel like I could support one... then this happened right as things we’re actually beginning to happen for the better.  I guess I’m just hoping i wont become numb and fade away, but will instead, stay active and have faith that there is someone also positive out there who I will meet, and not too late to have a chance to bring a couple kids into the world.

wow, sorry about length. Thanks again for the message and positivity.

 

Again no worries, your story is almost identical to mine just mine, except there has not been any movement in research for the past 20 years that I had had this infection. I would keep the faith for the next few years, as some real promising work is going on now. should still give you an opportunity to get you life back on track.

 

Edited by Tired of waiting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ManagingIllness
Posted (edited)

I just want to reiterate what a few other people have said: "In 2009, people were saying we're 10 years away. Now it is 2019, and people are saying it is 10 years away"

There has been a massive amount of progress in the field over the past decade, so let's not forget that. Also, given the nature of this kind of work, it could easily be another 20 years before we get the type of progress we are all hoping for. So I leave you with two things:

i) research is being done, and advancements are being made (e.g., the new class of drugs & a far better understanding of how HSV operates)
ii) a cure is likely a long way away

Edited by ManagingIllness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iFdUp
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, ManagingIllness said:

I just want to reiterate what a few other people have said: "In 2009, people were saying we're 10 years away. Now it is 2019, and people are saying it is 10 years away"

There has been a massive amount of progress in the field over the past decade, so let's not forget that. Also, given the nature of this kind of work, it could easily be another 20 years before we get the type of progress we are all hoping for. So I leave you with two things:

i) research is being done, and advancements are being made (e.g., the new class of drugs & a far better understanding of how HSV operates)
ii) a cure is likely a long way away

It really isn't. 

It is only a matter of time before someone decides to buy Dr Jeromes research and turns it into capitol.

I see a potential for a functional cure or further in the works with two different teams that should be testing in humans within a few years. 

*EDIT* 

Gonna vent a bit of frustration here. 

I'm sick of reading negativity about the likelihood of a cure just because of our track record. I went back to take a look at the forums in 2010 and the threads that were here at that time.

There isn't anything hopeful in those posts back then, not compared to even one of the things on the front page of this sub-forum now. 

I think the most inspiring post we have seen made on this forum ever is probably the one Mikeherp posted about the FHC Jerome lab progress. (50-90% latent HSV elimination) 

 

Edited by iFdUp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MiLoBeng
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, ManagingIllness said:

I just want to reiterate what a few other people have said: "In 2009, people were saying we're 10 years away. Now it is 2019, and people are saying it is 10 years away"

There has been a massive amount of progress in the field over the past decade, so let's not forget that. Also, given the nature of this kind of work, it could easily be another 20 years before we get the type of progress we are all hoping for. So I leave you with two things:

i) research is being done, and advancements are being made (e.g., the new class of drugs & a far better understanding of how HSV operates)
ii) a cure is likely a long way away

True. Having too much of an expectation will only lead to greater disappointment. 
But we're talking about "GENE EDITING" here. Not your average vaccine cure/therapeutic vaccine. I believe 10 years ago or more are just about researching in vaccine only (gene editing is very new back then and nobody bothers to invest time/money on it until 2015-2016)
Moreover, elimination of HIV in mice with CRISPR is made POSSIBLE just recently (first time ever) and I'm really surprised. I thought they're going to take maybe 10 years or more to find out since elimination of HIV is so much harder than HSV.   
In conclusion, if gene editing wasn't discovered and researched then "YES". It could take 20 years or more.
And I can tell gene editing has greater potential than vaccine in finding cure. Cheers

Edited by MiLoBeng

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ManagingIllness
Quote

In 2012, Jinek et al. first demonstrated that CRISPR could be programmed for targeted DNA cleavage in vitro. In 2013, Cong et al. and Mali et al. described CRISPR-based genome editing in mammalian cell culture. Five years later, PubMed lists more than 6,300 CRISPR-related publications, many of which detail work to improve the tool’s specificity, orthogonality, and multiplexibility in various species, as well as the development of new applications.

https://www.addgene.org/crispr/history/

The point here is that gene CRISPR being used for gene editing has been known for at least 6 years, and we have barely entered stage 1 clinical trials on most applications of CRISPR. It's mostly still preclinical, and for good reason. I remember 2001 when excitement about stem cells was growing large. Huge advancements were being made, and the technology proposed many things. Perhaps we would be able to re-grow tissue, perhaps we could cure spinal cord injuries, and perhaps we could grow perfectly compatible organs outside the body. Stem cell research continues to evolve and develop, but as you can tell, it hasn't yet crested those promised lands.

The video below is a 2016 video discussing the promises of "regenerative medicine". Covered in the video are the same points made in the early 2000s when stem cells mastery might have been a mere decade away. My point here is that nearly 2 decades later, and the field is still majorly in the trial phase regarding many of its applications. We still can't fully heal spinal cord damage, which seemed like a possibility two decades ago. Everyone is right to say that we times have change - they most certainly have! Does that mean that for your - our - particular illness the future will be different than the past, and major achievements will be rushed through trials and to patients? You may choose to believe that unlikely possibility. I fail to see any reason to believe it though.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iFdUp
19 minutes ago, ManagingIllness said:

https://www.addgene.org/crispr/history/

The point here is that gene CRISPR being used for gene editing has been known for at least 6 years, and we have barely entered stage 1 clinical trials on most applications of CRISPR. It's mostly still preclinical, and for good reason. I remember 2001 when excitement about stem cells was growing large. Huge advancements were being made, and the technology proposed many things. Perhaps we would be able to re-grow tissue, perhaps we could cure spinal cord injuries, and perhaps we could grow perfectly compatible organs outside the body. Stem cell research continues to evolve and develop, but as you can tell, it hasn't yet crested those promised lands.

The video below is a 2016 video discussing the promises of "regenerative medicine". Covered in the video are the same points made in the early 2000s when stem cells mastery might have been a mere decade away. My point here is that nearly 2 decades later, and the field is still majorly in the trial phase regarding many of its applications. We still can't fully heal spinal cord damage, which seemed like a possibility two decades ago. Everyone is right to say that we times have change - they most certainly have! Does that mean that for your - our - particular illness the future will be different than the past, and major achievements will be rushed through trials and to patients? You may choose to believe that unlikely possibility. I fail to see any reason to believe it though.

 

 

How about the meganuclease work that Dr Jerome is doing? 

That gives you zero hope despite its 90% efficacy in regard to latent HSV elimination in vivo models? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
T9000
1 hour ago, ManagingIllness said:

https://www.addgene.org/crispr/history/

The point here is that gene CRISPR being used for gene editing has been known for at least 6 years, and we have barely entered stage 1 clinical trials on most applications of CRISPR. It's mostly still preclinical, and for good reason. I remember 2001 when excitement about stem cells was growing large. Huge advancements were being made, and the technology proposed many things. Perhaps we would be able to re-grow tissue, perhaps we could cure spinal cord injuries, and perhaps we could grow perfectly compatible organs outside the body. Stem cell research continues to evolve and develop, but as you can tell, it hasn't yet crested those promised lands.

The video below is a 2016 video discussing the promises of "regenerative medicine". Covered in the video are the same points made in the early 2000s when stem cells mastery might have been a mere decade away. My point here is that nearly 2 decades later, and the field is still majorly in the trial phase regarding many of its applications. We still can't fully heal spinal cord damage, which seemed like a possibility two decades ago. Everyone is right to say that we times have change - they most certainly have! Does that mean that for your - our - particular illness the future will be different than the past, and major achievements will be rushed through trials and to patients? You may choose to believe that unlikely possibility. I fail to see any reason to believe it though.

 

 

I don't think they're exactly comparable in this way. Stem cell research was just that, research. Research with grand ideas for application but sort of a vague understanding of how those applications would be achieved. And eventually they figured out that they weren't going to be able to apply it in the ways that they wanted to. Gene editing is an actual practice that been demonstrated in vitro and seemingly works in the same way and on the same scale that it would in the human body. With stem cells it was  "we've grown these liver cells so now we predict that we're going to be able to grow an entire human organ outside of the human body even though we don't really know how that would work". With gene editing it's more "hey here's how this works in vitro, we don't know if it's going to work in vivo but we do know how it’s going to be applied". It's just more straight-forward conceptally, from what I can tell. It may be that gene editing never works in the human body at all, but the field seems to be evolving a lot more quickly than stem cell research ever did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
brookeb300
2 hours ago, ManagingIllness said:

https://www.addgene.org/crispr/history/

The point here is that gene CRISPR being used for gene editing has been known for at least 6 years, and we have barely entered stage 1 clinical trials on most applications of CRISPR. It's mostly still preclinical, and for good reason. I remember 2001 when excitement about stem cells was growing large. Huge advancements were being made, and the technology proposed many things. Perhaps we would be able to re-grow tissue, perhaps we could cure spinal cord injuries, and perhaps we could grow perfectly compatible organs outside the body. Stem cell research continues to evolve and develop, but as you can tell, it hasn't yet crested those promised lands.

The video below is a 2016 video discussing the promises of "regenerative medicine". Covered in the video are the same points made in the early 2000s when stem cells mastery might have been a mere decade away. My point here is that nearly 2 decades later, and the field is still majorly in the trial phase regarding many of its applications. We still can't fully heal spinal cord damage, which seemed like a possibility two decades ago. Everyone is right to say that we times have change - they most certainly have! Does that mean that for your - our - particular illness the future will be different than the past, and major achievements will be rushed through trials and to patients? You may choose to believe that unlikely possibility. I fail to see any reason to believe it though.

 

 

I tend to agree with although I wish I didn’t. I still am donating to the Jerome research bc the Seattle people are really good and have done tons of great herpes research and I am hoping and praying that the gene editing can really be a cure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cas9
Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, brookeb300 said:

I tend to agree with although I wish I didn’t. I still am donating to the Jerome research bc the Seattle people are really good and have done tons of great herpes research and I am hoping and praying that the gene editing can really be a cure.

I tend to disagree. The analogy with stem cell research, at least as presented here on this thread, is too general/simplistic. There are no specifics presented as to why the promises with other technologies, such as stem cell research, have taken so long. I simply don't think that comparing Keith Jerome's work with meganucleases, that have already shown great promise, is a good comparison with stem cell research.

Jerome's work may very well take a long time but that may simply be because the process to market is inherently long.

Edited by Cas9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iFdUp

It is just really silly not to believe in what the FHC/ Jeromelab team is doing. 

They got their treatment into neurons, those may have been neurons in mice but that is still a hell of a proof of concept. 

Human neurons are just bigger versions of what mice have. You can say there are many differences between humans and mice, but the physical construction of the neuron isn't really one of them. 

As long as they get the cutting endonuclease to its destination it seems like it will work. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Psyc4herbs

Medical knowledge in the 50s doubled every 50 years. But guess how fast the knowledge is doubling now? 1 year.

Cures are coming. This is why there is a worldwide debate on healthcare. Some want to own your health others want the cures for free. You being desperate will trample on the next person to get it whereas someone else will hope the cure is free for all. 

The fight isn't for a cure anymore it's for who owns the cure. The people or the elite. With medical knowledge doubling every year and soon every 6 months with the assistance of AI a cure will be ready by 2025. 

Finally the west has competition who wants to be the world's leader; China. They want to cure diseases because they want rid of capitalism and religion. May the winner have it all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LightafterDarkness
Posted (edited)

Two reasons to be optimistic in my opinion: First, medical progress and science is moving at the fastest pace ever as new findings and technology build on each other so there is alot of room for optimism over the next couple of years. Second, from a straight up Capitalism point of view there is alot money to be made here given the total number of people with HSV1 or HSV2 so thats added incentive.

 

I would love to see the following scenario play out for people who carry the virus over the next 5 years: 

  • (1) Pritelivir becomes available in 2020 which dramatically reduces shedding and symptoms
  • (2) Combo of Pritelivir+Valacyclovir taken daily is shown to be a functional cure with basically 99.99% chance (one can hope for this number- not known today) that you cant pass it on (i.e., akin to HIV PREP)
  • (3) Some Vaccine comes out to help protect people who dont have HSV and perhaps further strengthen those who carry virus
  • (4) Gene therapy is perfected for full cure or some other treatment provides a full cure (e.g., some medicine that flushes all the herpes i.e., they are not latent allowing the body to destroy all the viruses)
Edited by LightafterDarkness
spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Focri
Posted (edited)

I love the idea that because it’s so widespread (and not life threatening for the most part) it has certainly enabled situations where people who do have it, to actually have the added motivation to work on it, knowing first hand how it impacts us. 

I’d hate to sound like an hsv cure is the most import thing on the planet... all im saying is that its inspiring to think there’s people out there working to cure themselves, as well as the community. 

Edited by Focri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Donate

    If Honeycomb has helped you, please help us by making a donation so we can provide you with even better features and services.

  • The Hive is Thriving!

    • Total Topics
      70,309
    • Total Posts
      475,370
  • 0_unsure-if-it-is-herpes.png

    Unsure if you have an STD?
    Get started with testing options here

  • Posts

    • alextheman
      You have to lower your stress.Stress is a big key.Me im trying to sleep more and lower my stress.Im trying to not worry about having herpes.I have it,and there is nothing i can do,So why stress myself about it?Im taking medicine to help suppress it.For me stress and sleep are my biggest factors.
    • nakedandafraid
      How long after you had sex with this woman did you exhibit symptoms? What makes you think she has herpes?
    • hobson
      Hi she got the cold sore a couple days ago after oral . Always use a condom. She isn’t got herpes as far as I’m aware but she got a cold after she performed oral on me . She sent me a pic of the cold sores.  I don’t know why they didn’t do blood tests. I have read a PCR test is accurate. I don’t know how to get closure from this. 
    • nakedandafraid
      Im no admin, but ive seen many folks share photos looking for info. I think its ok.  If I may ask, how long after having sex with this woman did the symptoms appear?  Ive heard that pc swabs are pretty accurate.. Did this woman tell you she has herpes, or did you hear it through a third party?  I dont see why they wouldnt give you the iGg / iGm blood test. If im not mistaken, you can order one yourself and go to a local Quest/Labcorp (depending on where you live)  i assume the cold sores are on her mouth? Did you see them, or did she tell you about them?   
    • WilsoInAus
      Hey @K1009 that all sounds a typical experience of transmission between partners. Please take heart, after the first few months, many people experience extremely few outbreaks of any with gHSV-1. Also you cannot feasibly give this back to your partner, you are now concordant sexually in terms of HSV and your immune systems will protect you from further infection.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.