Jump to content

Constant pain without any visible symptoms


Recommended Posts

My history:
I am male a male in my late 20's and have had genital HSV2 for just over 3 years now (diagnosed with swab test), and started daily suppressive therapy with 800mg acyclovir around 6 months after diagnosis I was getting outbreaks every few weeks. My outbreaks were not very bad especially the first one which was quite minor, and they've not been very painful. I would still get the odd outbreak every few months even on suppressive therapy.

My problem (constant pain with no outbreaks)
For the last 6 months I haven't had any outbreaks which is the longest time without any. I reduced my daily acyclovir dose to 400mg around 3 months ago and I started getting pain emanating from the sites I normally have outbreaks upwards into my pelvis. I have increased my dose back up and even tried doubling it to 1600mg a day but it's not helping with this constant pain. It get's really bad if I have sex or masturbate. Could this be some kind of neuropathy? Any help or ideas would be appreciated so much.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

which kind of pain is it? A very fast pain, with short duration and high intensity, like being zapped with electricity? I get that kind of pain in the genital area since after the infection, a very few times a year. It starts from the backbone and it's definitely a nerve pain: I suppose it is related to reactivation of the infection and reaction of the immune system in the nerves.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, honeybadger said:

My history:
I am male a male in my late 20's and have had genital HSV2 for just over 3 years now (diagnosed with swab test), and started daily suppressive therapy with 800mg acyclovir around 6 months after diagnosis I was getting outbreaks every few weeks. My outbreaks were not very bad especially the first one which was quite minor, and they've not been very painful. I would still get the odd outbreak every few months even on suppressive therapy.

My problem (constant pain with no outbreaks)
For the last 6 months I haven't had any outbreaks which is the longest time without any. I reduced my daily acyclovir dose to 400mg around 3 months ago and I started getting pain emanating from the sites I normally have outbreaks upwards into my pelvis. I have increased my dose back up and even tried doubling it to 1600mg a day but it's not helping with this constant pain. It get's really bad if I have sex or masturbate. Could this be some kind of neuropathy? Any help or ideas would be appreciated so much.

 

 

Well according to Wilso, who is this sites resident expert, HSV does not behave this way ever so it must not be related at all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it would probably qualify as some form of sensory neuropathy. Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner, and if it doesn't travel into the skin and erupt in the form of blisters, it still replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms; paresthesia and neuralgia. Sometimes these sensations are accompanied by fasciculations, those little "twitches" of the nerves. The rectivation in the nerves may be due to UV light, lowered immunity, stress, and also because of the mechanical stimulation of the nerve endings in the area of outbreaks, which sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate, and/or aggravates the remaining inflammation that's already present due to previous herpes activity. For some of the genital herpes sufferers especially the last one of those causes is unfortunate, because sex or masturbation will stimulate those nerve endings and there's no way around it. That's why your symptoms also are made worse by sex or masturbation. 

There may not be visible outbreaks, or they may be very mild, because over time a sufficient epithelial and mucosal immune response could develop and keep the actual outbreaks of blisters at bay, but the sensations you describe could perhaps be described as "outbreaks limited to inside the nerves" - and even for those who get visual blisters, they are usually accompanied by these nerve sensations. It's herpes being active on the level of nerves. And for some reason for some people it lasts or remains "constant", as you described, in fluctuating intensity. This could be because of the remaining inflammation or injury to the nerves even after the virus has gone dormant again (if it ever even does so completely), which would mean it has a "post-herpetic" element to it -- but, in the case of Herpes Simplex, it would perhaps be more fitting to call it "inter-herpetic", because the nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more... So it's probably not only due to an active viral replication, but its after-effects also. When the pain grows in intensity or becomes more widespread, that's likely a sign of (a more?) active herpes. 

I'm not sure what could be done about it. That's what I too would like to know.  

 

Edited by Lemnity
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, honeybadger said:

My history:
I am male a male in my late 20's and have had genital HSV2 for just over 3 years now (diagnosed with swab test), and started daily suppressive therapy with 800mg acyclovir around 6 months after diagnosis I was getting outbreaks every few weeks. My outbreaks were not very bad especially the first one which was quite minor, and they've not been very painful. I would still get the odd outbreak every few months even on suppressive therapy.

My problem (constant pain with no outbreaks)
For the last 6 months I haven't had any outbreaks which is the longest time without any. I reduced my daily acyclovir dose to 400mg around 3 months ago and I started getting pain emanating from the sites I normally have outbreaks upwards into my pelvis. I have increased my dose back up and even tried doubling it to 1600mg a day but it's not helping with this constant pain. It get's really bad if I have sex or masturbate. Could this be some kind of neuropathy? Any help or ideas would be appreciated so much.

 

 

The same thing happened with me . My outbreaks were never painful infact totally painless. But i used to get them every 2.5 months which usually resolved within 2 days. But since i took acyclovir on my doctor's prescription i have been suffering from last two months constantly. Now their are no visible outbreaks but their is constant burning pain in penis glans along with frequent nerve tingles. Burning subsided in 12 days but the discomfort still persists today. My doctor then prescribed neubaga tablets for 15 days . Nerve tingles and discomfort has come down but not got to zero. And this has been happening to me since last 2.5 months.

Taking ashwagandha with turmeric/circumin in hot milk every night helped a lot. Also adding lysine 2000 mg a day helped. Never put cold water or ice directly on skin.

Try to take becasule Z tablets which have zinc with b complex vitamins. Also add vitamin c tablets. 

I think i have done a mistake by going to doctor in first place and taking anti virals when my outbreaks were not painful at all. My immunity was handling it in nice way but i think i have depleted my antibodies by taking antivirals.

I would recommend not to take regular antiviral for days if your outbreaks are not painful otherwise u might get in a trouble like i m in. Rather try to use it as an episodic treatment only.

Keep looking for rational vaccines ,they will soon begin the therapeutic vaccine trials. Thats a hope for us. And also for new hsv529 vaccine trials.

 

Edited by Shubhherpe
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lemnity said:

Yes, it would probably qualify as some form of sensory neuropathy. Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner, and if it doesn't travel into the skin and erupt in the form of blisters, it still replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms; paresthesia and neuralgia. Sometimes these sensations are accompanied by fasciculations, those little "twitches" of the nerves. The rectivation in the nerves may be due to UV light, lowered immunity, stress, and also because of the mechanical stimulation of the nerve endings in the area of outbreaks, which sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate, and/or aggravates the remaining inflammation that's already present due to previous herpes activity. For some of the genital herpes sufferers especially the last one of those causes is unfortunate, because sex or masturbation will stimulate those nerve endings and there's no way around it. That's why your symptoms also are made worse by sex or masturbation. 

There may not be visible outbreaks, or they may be very mild, because over time a sufficient epithelial and mucosal immune response could develop and keep the actual outbreaks of blisters at bay, but the sensations you describe could perhaps be described as "outbreaks limited to inside the nerves" - and even for those who get visual blisters, they are usually accompanied by these nerve sensations. It's herpes being active on the level of nerves. And for some reason for some people it lasts or remains "constant", as you described, in fluctuating intensity. This could be because of the remaining inflammation or injury to the nerves even after the virus has gone dormant again (if it ever even does so completely), which would mean it has a "post-herpetic" element to it -- but, in the case of Herpes Simplex, it would perhaps be more fitting to call it "inter-herpetic", because the nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more... So it's probably not only due to an active viral replication, but its after-effects also. When the pain grows in intensity or becomes more widespread, that's likely a sign of (a more?) active herpes. 

I'm not sure what could be done about it. That's what I too would like to know.  

 

Finally, someone on this website who knows what they are talking about.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Lemnity said:

Yes, it would probably qualify as some form of sensory neuropathy. Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner, and if it doesn't travel into the skin and erupt in the form of blisters, it still replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms; paresthesia and neuralgia. Sometimes these sensations are accompanied by fasciculations, those little "twitches" of the nerves. The rectivation in the nerves may be due to UV light, lowered immunity, stress, and also because of the mechanical stimulation of the nerve endings in the area of outbreaks, which sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate, and/or aggravates the remaining inflammation that's already present due to previous herpes activity. For some of the genital herpes sufferers especially the last one of those causes is unfortunate, because sex or masturbation will stimulate those nerve endings and there's no way around it. That's why your symptoms also are made worse by sex or masturbation. 

There may not be visible outbreaks, or they may be very mild, because over time a sufficient epithelial and mucosal immune response could develop and keep the actual outbreaks of blisters at bay, but the sensations you describe could perhaps be described as "outbreaks limited to inside the nerves" - and even for those who get visual blisters, they are usually accompanied by these nerve sensations. It's herpes being active on the level of nerves. And for some reason for some people it lasts or remains "constant", as you described, in fluctuating intensity. This could be because of the remaining inflammation or injury to the nerves even after the virus has gone dormant again (if it ever even does so completely), which would mean it has a "post-herpetic" element to it -- but, in the case of Herpes Simplex, it would perhaps be more fitting to call it "inter-herpetic", because the nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more... So it's probably not only due to an active viral replication, but its after-effects also. When the pain grows in intensity or becomes more widespread, that's likely a sign of (a more?) active herpes. 

I'm not sure what could be done about it. That's what I too would like to know.  

 

Hey there @Lemnity there is a lot of guess work here, most of which is unsubstantiated.

Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner - does it? how? HSV is not alive and doesn't sleep. It exists in an equilibrium that is upset from time to time, nerve excitation as you put it has not been shown to be an example.

those little "twitches" of the nerves - nerves do not twitch, I think you are referring to muscle twitches that herpes has not been shown to cause

replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms - what sensory symptoms? the virus is not known to cause sensory symptoms on its own. It is theorised that there may be some form of signal interference.

sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate - I don't believe the nerves can stimulate replication, do you have sources for this?

nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more - what healing? the presence of the herpes virus actually promotes healthier nerves, HSV-1/2 has not been shown to 'damage' nerves, quite the opposite, people with herpes are shown to have better quality and density of nerves.

In your note you point to inflammation issues, essentially suggesting that the immune response could be the cause of the pain and related issues. This may be quite possible, think arthritis for example. Herpes may play a role in this, although more likely its a combination of the immune response to viruses and bacteria in the body generally.

Happy to be corrected, but I am not aware of any case studies that support your comments.

Note that I have no doubt that people with genital herpes suffer pain. It is rare but of course happens. However the symptoms you describe above happen to people without herpes at the same sort of frequency that points to non herpes causes being likely for may people.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, WilsoInAus said:

Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner - does it? how? HSV is not alive and doesn't sleep. It exists in an equilibrium that is upset from time to time, nerve excitation as you put it has not been shown to be an example.

those little "twitches" of the nerves - nerves do not twitch, I think you are referring to muscle twitches that herpes has not been shown to cause

replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms - what sensory symptoms? the virus is not known to cause sensory symptoms on its own. It is theorised that there may be some form of signal interference.

sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate - I don't believe the nerves can stimulate replication, do you have sources for this?

nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more - what healing? the presence of the herpes virus actually promotes healthier nerves, HSV-1/2 has not been shown to 'damage' nerves, quite the opposite, people with herpes are shown to have better quality and density of nerves.

In your note you point to inflammation issues, essentially suggesting that the immune response could be the cause of the pain and related issues. This may be quite possible, think arthritis for example. Herpes may play a role in this, although more likely its a combination of the immune response to viruses and bacteria in the body generally.

Happy to be corrected, but I am not aware of any case studies that support your comments.

Note that I have no doubt that people with genital herpes suffer pain. It is rare but of course happens. However the symptoms you describe above happen to people without herpes at the same sort of frequency that points to non herpes causes being likely for may people.

"does it? how? HSV is not alive and doesn't sleep. It exists in an equilibrium that is upset from time to time, nerve excitation as you put it has not been shown to be an example."

I think you know that "sleeping" and "waking up" are pretty widely used analogies for herpes dormancy and re-activation. Maybe it should have been in quotation marks to make it clear that this was the manner in which I meant it.

"Friction from sex" is often cited as a cause for herpes outbreaks. Friction from sex is local, on the surface of the skin or mucosa. HSV is not a local skin condition, but resides in the ganglion from which it activates ("wakes up") and travels through the nerve to the skin or mucosa to cause an outbreak. Now, if friction from sex can activate a herpes outbreak, how does that happen if it isn't nerve-mediated? I called it  "excitation of the nerves", but maybe I could also have called it "stress on the nerves" - the sense is the same.  Also dental work can sometimes trigger herpes outbreaks, etc. -- what else would account for it, other than stress on the nerves due to the irritation of a dermatome resulting in the "equilibrium" of HSV being "upset"(as you put it)? The local irritation of the dermatomal surface seems to affect the behavior of the virus in the neuron in a retrograde fashion through the nerves.

"nerves do not twitch, I think you are referring to muscle twitches that herpes has not been shown to cause"

Perhaps I should have said "around the nerves". Something that hasn't been shown to happen may still happen. In the dorsal root ganglion there is a sensory dorsal root and a motor ventral root closely connected. It's pretty expectable that herpes affects the motor aspect also, even if the phenomenon isn't completely understood or "shown" yet.

"what sensory symptoms? the virus is not known to cause sensory symptoms on its own. It is theorised that there may be some form of signal interference."

Here you seem to be talking semantics. Of course nothing causes anything on its own. The effect is always mediated by a reaction. If there is some form of "signal interference" accounting for the sensory symptom and it is due to the herpes virus being present and wouldn't happen if it wasn't present, then it can be described as herpes causing it. Similarly, if I get stabbed and say that the stabbing caused me to bleed, it wouldn't be questioned -- even though it is known that getting stabbed doesn't actually cause one to bleed, but the fact that blood vessels were torn. 

"what healing? the presence of the herpes virus actually promotes healthier nerves, HSV-1/2 has not been shown to 'damage' nerves, quite the opposite, people with herpes are shown to have better quality and density of nerves."

Okay, fair enough. My use of the terms "injury" and "healing" probably wasn't very scientific, but more of a layman's heuristic to describe the (what we could call) "alteration" and "normalization" of the nerve function when it comes to the sensory changes. Painful nerve could be an exceptionally "healthy" nerve biologically, but in terms of human experience (which is what matters when it comes to wellness and illness), it's no consolation to know that this alteration due to herpes is actually "health-promoting" for the nerve, if at the same time  this altered process is also a cause of unease for the subject. Also, "health" and the "quality" of the nerve is here partly conflated with the "survival" of the nerve. There is no logical or foreseeable empirical obstacle for thinking that this enhanced survival of the nerve might happen at the cost of having bothersome altered sensations. So when I say "healing", I mean it in the sense of "returning back to normal" in terms of what is felt and perceived by the subject.

"In your note you point to inflammation issues, essentially suggesting that the immune response could be the cause of the pain and related issues. This may be quite possible, think arthritis for example. Herpes may play a role in this, although more likely its a combination of the immune response to viruses and bacteria in the body generally."

Yes. I'm not sure if you are here implying that the herpes couldn't be said to be the "cause" of pain if the immune response was in fact the culprit, but if you are, we are back to the semantics. If there is a bothersome immune-mediated response to the presence of a herpes virus, it's not that questionable to simplify it by saying that herpes is the cause. But what you say of course has relevance in terms of how to possibly alleviate the symptoms: if inflammation was in fact the cause of these symptoms, and there was a way to tune down this inflammatory immune response to the herpes, then that might suffice to ease the symptoms, and in that case there might not be as great a need for being preoccupied with the presence of the virus itself . 

There may or may not be studies supporting my comments, but I see them as akin to those archaic descriptions of disease states by physicians from former centuries who probably got some things wrong or at least used underdeveloped language to describe their observations, and did so with no idea of the more essential cellular mechanisms at play, but whose basic observations were later validated more objectively and described more accurately by modern science. But the science around these aspects of herpes will never develop if what was to be studied is paradigmatically written out of the equation from the get-go: "this doesn't happen with herpes, so why study it?" --- "no study of this" may come to be equated with "study of no-this", absence of proof taken as proof of absence. 

Edited by Lemnity
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
On 7/22/2020 at 2:05 PM, Lemnity said:

Yes, it would probably qualify as some form of sensory neuropathy. Excitation of the nerves in which the HSV resides will wake it up in some manner, and if it doesn't travel into the skin and erupt in the form of blisters, it still replicates and moves around in the nerves, causing the sensory symptoms; paresthesia and neuralgia. Sometimes these sensations are accompanied by fasciculations, those little "twitches" of the nerves. The rectivation in the nerves may be due to UV light, lowered immunity, stress, and also because of the mechanical stimulation of the nerve endings in the area of outbreaks, which sends the impulse through the nerves and this "excites" the virus to activate, and/or aggravates the remaining inflammation that's already present due to previous herpes activity. For some of the genital herpes sufferers especially the last one of those causes is unfortunate, because sex or masturbation will stimulate those nerve endings and there's no way around it. That's why your symptoms also are made worse by sex or masturbation. 

There may not be visible outbreaks, or they may be very mild, because over time a sufficient epithelial and mucosal immune response could develop and keep the actual outbreaks of blisters at bay, but the sensations you describe could perhaps be described as "outbreaks limited to inside the nerves" - and even for those who get visual blisters, they are usually accompanied by these nerve sensations. It's herpes being active on the level of nerves. And for some reason for some people it lasts or remains "constant", as you described, in fluctuating intensity. This could be because of the remaining inflammation or injury to the nerves even after the virus has gone dormant again (if it ever even does so completely), which would mean it has a "post-herpetic" element to it -- but, in the case of Herpes Simplex, it would perhaps be more fitting to call it "inter-herpetic", because the nerves probably don't have enough of a chance to heal before the next activation happens and irritates them more... So it's probably not only due to an active viral replication, but its after-effects also. When the pain grows in intensity or becomes more widespread, that's likely a sign of (a more?) active herpes. 

I'm not sure what could be done about it. That's what I too would like to know.  

 

Just wanted to say you seem like one of the only people on this forum that actually knows what they are talking about. Do you have any thoughts on Amitriptyline or gabapentin for the neuropathic issues? Thanks. @Lemnity

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
StucklikeChuck
On 11/23/2020 at 11:15 PM, WilsoInAus said:

That's correct. Technically PHN refers to the issues associated with damage caused to nerve cells by an activation of HSV-2 (Herpes Zoster). HSV-1/2 does not cause the same nature of damage,

It would appear extremely unlikely that HSV-1 causes nerve related pain directly. What is more likely is that your immune system maybe reacting to HSV-1 or other viruses to cause you issues. There are also many other causes of (nerve) pains as well.

 

On 7/23/2020 at 6:01 AM, Lemnity said:

"does it? how? HSV is not alive and doesn't sleep. It exists in an equilibrium that is upset from time to time, nerve excitation as you put it has not been shown to be an example."

I think you know that "sleeping" and "waking up" are pretty widely used analogies for herpes dormancy and re-activation. Maybe it should have been in quotation marks to make it clear that this was the manner in which I meant it.

"Friction from sex" is often cited as a cause for herpes outbreaks. Friction from sex is local, on the surface of the skin or mucosa. HSV is not a local skin condition, but resides in the ganglion from which it activates ("wakes up") and travels through the nerve to the skin or mucosa to cause an outbreak. Now, if friction from sex can activate a herpes outbreak, how does that happen if it isn't nerve-mediated? I called it  "excitation of the nerves", but maybe I could also have called it "stress on the nerves" - the sense is the same.  Also dental work can sometimes trigger herpes outbreaks, etc. -- what else would account for it, other than stress on the nerves due to the irritation of a dermatome resulting in the "equilibrium" of HSV being "upset"(as you put it)? The local irritation of the dermatomal surface seems to affect the behavior of the virus in the neuron in a retrograde fashion through the nerves.

"nerves do not twitch, I think you are referring to muscle twitches that herpes has not been shown to cause"

Perhaps I should have said "around the nerves". Something that hasn't been shown to happen may still happen. In the dorsal root ganglion there is a sensory dorsal root and a motor ventral root closely connected. It's pretty expectable that herpes affects the motor aspect also, even if the phenomenon isn't completely understood or "shown" yet.

"what sensory symptoms? the virus is not known to cause sensory symptoms on its own. It is theorised that there may be some form of signal interference."

Here you seem to be talking semantics. Of course nothing causes anything on its own. The effect is always mediated by a reaction. If there is some form of "signal interference" accounting for the sensory symptom and it is due to the herpes virus being present and wouldn't happen if it wasn't present, then it can be described as herpes causing it. Similarly, if I get stabbed and say that the stabbing caused me to bleed, it wouldn't be questioned -- even though it is known that getting stabbed doesn't actually cause one to bleed, but the fact that blood vessels were torn. 

"what healing? the presence of the herpes virus actually promotes healthier nerves, HSV-1/2 has not been shown to 'damage' nerves, quite the opposite, people with herpes are shown to have better quality and density of nerves."

Okay, fair enough. My use of the terms "injury" and "healing" probably wasn't very scientific, but more of a layman's heuristic to describe the (what we could call) "alteration" and "normalization" of the nerve function when it comes to the sensory changes. Painful nerve could be an exceptionally "healthy" nerve biologically, but in terms of human experience (which is what matters when it comes to wellness and illness), it's no consolation to know that this alteration due to herpes is actually "health-promoting" for the nerve, if at the same time  this altered process is also a cause of unease for the subject. Also, "health" and the "quality" of the nerve is here partly conflated with the "survival" of the nerve. There is no logical or foreseeable empirical obstacle for thinking that this enhanced survival of the nerve might happen at the cost of having bothersome altered sensations. So when I say "healing", I mean it in the sense of "returning back to normal" in terms of what is felt and perceived by the subject.

"In your note you point to inflammation issues, essentially suggesting that the immune response could be the cause of the pain and related issues. This may be quite possible, think arthritis for example. Herpes may play a role in this, although more likely its a combination of the immune response to viruses and bacteria in the body generally."

Yes. I'm not sure if you are here implying that the herpes couldn't be said to be the "cause" of pain if the immune response was in fact the culprit, but if you are, we are back to the semantics. If there is a bothersome immune-mediated response to the presence of a herpes virus, it's not that questionable to simplify it by saying that herpes is the cause. But what you say of course has relevance in terms of how to possibly alleviate the symptoms: if inflammation was in fact the cause of these symptoms, and there was a way to tune down this inflammatory immune response to the herpes, then that might suffice to ease the symptoms, and in that case there might not be as great a need for being preoccupied with the presence of the virus itself . 

There may or may not be studies supporting my comments, but I see them as akin to those archaic descriptions of disease states by physicians from former centuries who probably got some things wrong or at least used underdeveloped language to describe their observations, and did so with no idea of the more essential cellular mechanisms at play, but whose basic observations were later validated more objectively and described more accurately by modern science. But the science around these aspects of herpes will never develop if what was to be studied is paradigmatically written out of the equation from the get-go: "this doesn't happen with herpes, so why study it?" --- "no study of this" may come to be equated with "study of no-this", absence of proof taken as proof of absence. 

Fire 🔥🔥🔥

Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try getting Genferon suppositories that you buy from Russia. They are used boost interleukins and someone I know was using them and it was helping a lot with her neuritis. She gets it from genital HSV1 and doesn't get outbreaks, just the tingling, itching, nerve pain. She is planning on also using the Herpavac vaccine next from Russia. Ever since she got the chickenpox vaccine she hasn't had any outbreaks, just this neuritis/neuralgia.  

For me, I've been taking LDN (Low Dose Naltrexone) which modulates my immune system and has greatly reduced my daily symptoms. During the day I get practically no symptoms for last 2 weeks, but in the evenings I get some mild irritation. LDN is a prescription which I get from a naturopath. It is much safer than the antivirals and can have many benefits. I am now taking 2mg a day. I started at 0.5mg. I will keep increasing it slowly until hopefully all my symptoms disappear. Some have said this has happened for them who have hsv1 and it also benefits hsv2, like me. Check out this website to learn more.

ldnresearchtrust.org

Edited by Naturalady
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Donate

    If Honeycomb has helped you, please help us by making a donation so we can provide you with even better features and services.

  • The Hive is Thriving!

    • Total Topics
      71,664
    • Total Posts
      484,841
  • 0_unsure-if-it-is-herpes.png

    Nervous about dating with herpes? Skip "the talk" and browse profiles here.

  • Posts

    • StayStrongOk
      @dont quit!, Great effort by you to not pass it to your daughter. Fortunately, kissing is not the only way to show affection. I am sure you are already channelling through other means 🙂
    • Bd2132
      That is good to hear! I have my appointment this evening, so hopefully they agree it is something else. It has not changed in appearance since Friday when I originally posted also. 
    • t1berius1
      Thanks Wilson. Really appreciate the answer and contribution to this community! I guess I will sweat bullets for 12 weeks to get a better answer. 
    • n0v0c41n3
      Thanks for the input, I definitely did not know that prior to getting it I did want to input that I still only have the labia swelling but it hasn't progressed any further.
    • dont quit!17
      I'm sorry about your outbreak but as a Pfizer recipient that vaccine is potent and harsh with side effects. Wait until you get the second dose. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.